Abacus

Numbers

Cardinal numbers

1 = uno
28 = vientiocho
2 = dos
29 = vientinueve
3 = tres
30 = treinta
4 = cuatro
31 = treinta y uno
5 = cinco
32 = treinta y dos
6 = seis
40 = cuarenta
7 = siete
50 = cincuenta
8 = ocho
60 = sesenta
9 = nueve
70 = setenta
10 = diez
80 = ochenta
11 = once
90 = noventa
12 = doce
100 = cien
13 = trece
101 = ciento uno
14 = catorce
102 = ciento dos
15 = quince
200 = doscientos
16 = dieciséis
300 = trescientos
17 = diecisiete
400 = cuatrocientos
18 = dieciocho
500 = quinientos
19 = diecinueve
600 = seiscientos
20 = viente
700 = setecientos
21 = veintiuno
800 = ochocientos
22 = veintidós
900 = novecientos
23 = veintitrés
1.000 = mil
24 = veinticuatro
1.001 = mil uno
25 = veinticinco
10.000 = diez mil
26 = veintiséis
100.000 = cien mil
27 = veintisiete
1.000.000 = un million

In numbers after 30 the conjunction y is used between the tens and the units, but not between the hundreds and the tens:

46 = cuarenta y seis

432 = cuatrocientos treinta y dos

millón requires the use of de:

 

  •  a million people = un millón de personas

  •  three million votes = tres millones de votos

 

Numbers over one million

 

  •  1 000 000 000 = mil millones or un millardo (one billion)

  •  1 000 000 000 000 = un billón, un millón de millones (one trillion)

  •  1015 = mil billones (one quadrillion)

  •  1018 = un trillón (one quintillion)

 

The examples above show Spanish usage as recommended by the RAE. However, billón and trillón are increasingly being used as the equivalents of the English billion and trillion respectively. This usage is not sanctioned by the RAE.

It should be noted that the Real Academia Española (RAE) recommends the International Standardization Office's ruling on the treatment of thousands. This states that spaces should be used to separate groups of three digits. This has been followed in the list above. However, in practice it will be found that spaces, points, and commas are used as separators.

In most Spanish-speaking countries a point is used for writing figures over one thousand:

 

  •  1,000 (one thousand)= 1.000 (mil)

  •  1,000,000 (one million)= 1.000.000 (un millón)

 

Some Latin American countries, however, use the comma as in English:

 

  •  1,000 (one thousand)= 1,000 (mil)

  •  1,000,000 (one million)= 1,000,000 (un millón)

 

Gender and agreement

Numbers in Spanish are masculine when used as nouns, and require an article:

 

  •  there’s a zero missing = le falta un cero

  •  the prize went to number 21344 = el premio correspondió al veintiún mil trescientos cuarenta y cuatro

 

When a number refers to a noun which does not appear in the sentence, the article will agree with that noun:

 

  •  which is your office? – 603 = ¿cuál es tu oficina? – la 603

 

When used as adjectives, numbers are invariable, except uno and ciento, any number ending in uno and ciento, and quinientos:

 

  •  40 pounds = cuarenta libras

  •  300 euros = trescientos euros

 

Un/uno/una

uno becomes un before a masculine noun:

 

  •  one o a peso = un peso

  •  21 pesos = veintiún pesos

 

una is used before a feminine noun:

 

  •  one o a person = una persona

  •  a las veintiuna horas = at twenty-one hours

 

uno and una are used as pronouns:

 

  •  I have only one left = sólo me queda uno

  •  I asked him for one = le pedí una

 

Cien/ciento

The form cien is used:

▪ When the word is used alone:

 

  •  How many are there? – 100 = ¿cuántos hay? – cien

 

▪ When modifying another larger number:

 

  •  100,000 people = cien mil personas

  •  100,000,000 dollars = cien millones de dólares

 

▪ Before a noun:

 

  •  100 tickets = cien entradas

  •  100 pupils = cien alumnos

 

ciento is used to express numbers from 101 to 199:

 

  •  105 = ciento cinco

  •  198 = ciento noventa y ocho

 

Ordinal numbers

1st = primero

2nd = segundo

3rd = tercero

4th = cuarto

5th = quinto

6th = sexto

7th = séptimo

8th = octavo

9th = noveno

10th = décimo
10º
11th = undécimo or decimoprimero
11º
12th = duodécimo or decimosegundo
12º
13th = decimotercero
13º
14th = decimocuarto
14º
15th = decimoquinto
15º
16th = decimosexto
16º
17th = decimoséptimo
17º
18th = decimoctavo
18º
19th = decimonoveno or decimonono
19º
20th = vigésimo
20º
21st = vigesimoprimero
21º
22nd = vigesimosegundo
22º
23rd = vigesimotercero
23º
30th = trigésimo
30º
40th = cuadragésimo
40º
50th = quincuagésimo
50º
60th = sexagésimo
60º
70th = septuagésimo
70º
80th = octogésimo
80º
90th = nonagésimo
90º
100th = centésimo
100º
1,000th = milésimo
1.000º
1,000,000th = millonésimo
1.000.000º

Ordinals above décimo (10th) are often replaced by the corresponding cardinal number, especially in less formal speech:

 

  •  the 40th anniversary = el cuarenta or el cuadragésimo aniversario

 

Cardinal numbers are also used in titles where the number is above ten:

 

  •  Carlos V = Carlos quinto

  •  Isabel II = Isabel segunda

  •  Alfonso XIII = Alfonso trece

  •  Juan XXIII = Juan veintitrés

 

Gender and agreement

Spanish ordinal numbers agree with the noun they are qualifying, as do their abbreviated forms:

 

  •  the 2nd volume = el segundo tomo or el 20 tomo

  •  the 5th installment = la quinta entrega or la 5a entrega

 

primero and tercero become primer and tercer when they precede a masculine singular noun, even if there is an intervening adjective:

 

  •  his third attempt = su tercer intento

  •  the first great scholar of the subject = el primer gran estudioso del tema

 

The abbreviated forms of primer and tercer are 1er and 3er

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