Traducción de accretion en Español:

accretion

adición, n.

Pronunciación /əˈkriʃ(ə)n//əˈkriːʃ(ə)n/

nombre

  • 1

    (addition)
    adición femenino
    aditamento masculino
    • The leaves and stems of plants in brilliant primaries, created by the gradual accretion of six single-colour woodblocks, reach out across the space of the fabric.
    • The most negatively affected birds are those characterized by the otherwise desirable traits of rapid growth and muscle accretion.
    • Los Angeles itself grows by accretion, creeping eastward through the San Gorgonio Pass along the line of the San Andreas Fault, bulldozing further and further into the Mojave Desert.
    • On the other side of the coin, if we hypothesize that complex structures arise by gradual accretion and natural selection, then we would expect those structures to bear evidence of history.
    • Usually when one talks about a Darwinian explanation for something, the intention is to explain how the prolonged action of natural selection led to the formation of a complex structure through a process of gradual accretion.
    • Sponges grow by accretion and therefore lack a fixed primary axis.
    • A quiet work that slowly gathers momentum through accretion of personalities and individual histories, Homestead is the story of a small valley in Austria between 1906 and 1977.
    • That's not what geologists expect from the gradual accretion of crust at plate boundaries, but it could be the handiwork of episodic volcanic outbursts, fed by broad plumes of rock that rose periodically from deep in the mantle.
    • A sample curve would probably be organised in a series of steps - with gradual accretion of insight being the normal, but with occasional significant massive leaps also occurring.
    • And since that time, we've seen the gradual accretion of confidence in intervention in the cause of human rights, plus a fairly impressive armory of techniques and accomplices.
    • In other words, accretion occurs by the gradual acts of the sea or the water in a tidal area, and if something dramatic happens, like a reclamation, that cannot add anything to anybody's land.
    • His auspicious debut might have given him the leverage to realize some of his grander plans, but the Simon Fraser film grad says his films have grown by steady accretion of ideas and details, rather than an overarching scheme.
    • The sheer accretion of information about things is not enough.
    • The individual crystal grains that comprise these rocks have grown by molecular accretion, and the resultant interlocking structure is commonly extremely strong when the crystals are randomly orientated.
    • That bone grows through accretion, and is not extensively remodeled as the animal matures.
    • The list of international crimes, that is of the acts for whose accomplishment international law makes the authors criminally responsible, has come into being by gradual accretion.
    • Gentle but steady water movement produced by slow flow through lakes and meandering backwater stream channels provides aeration and slow accretion of alluvial sediments.
    • He has some (very large) movie files, along with selected stills of the formation of a ‘lunar seed’ through the rapid growth and accretion of particles.
    • The interior appears to have grown organically over time by a process of accretion similar to the formation of mould.
    • Theoretically, the result over time is the accretion of enough additional muscle mass to create both a visual difference and an increase in strength.
  • 2

    (process)
    acrecentamiento masculino