Traducción de mickey en Español:

mickey

Pronunciación /ˈmɪki//ˈmɪki/

nombre

Britanico
coloquial

  • 1

    to take the mickey (out of sb) reírse de algn
    • ‘I remember the professionals laughing and taking the mickey,’ he recalls.
    • Watson says the band took the mickey out of people who took themselves too seriously.
    • They liked irreverence, taking the mickey, politically incorrect humour, mockery, satire.
    • The others love taking the mickey out of my accent, but they are a cracking set of lads, and from day one made me feel very welcome.
    • My other half has started taking the mickey out of my taste in TV programmes, noting that all I watch are ‘Long Ago’ documentaries.
    • His capacity for taking the mickey out of defences was also legendary even though he could be diffident in front of goal in a way that Finney would have found unnatural.
    • I accept that if you go back a few years there were individuals effectively taking the mickey of the ill-health process, and I agree that there should be more stringent measures applied now to ensure that genuine people go.
    • You had to try and block your mind off from what they were talking about because they were laughing and joking and taking the mickey out of me.
    • So compulsive were his sketches, in which he mercilessly took the mickey out of his erstwhile colleagues, that at the age of 53 his public profile is higher than that of almost anyone in the shadow cabinet.
    • I do understand that it can be difficult dealing with male colleagues, especially if they are accustomed to mucking about and taking the mickey out of each other.
    • I've already had one busy weekend with them and they're taking the mickey out of me, which is a good sign.
    • I wasn't really sure if I was taking the mickey out of her, or she was taking the mickey out of me!
    • ‘I used to stick up for her at school and in the town when people took the mickey out of her,’ said 17-year-old Debbie.
    • A PUB landlord took the mickey out of his MP neighbour's opposition to wind farms by erecting a mini-turbine in his back yard.
    • I was terrified he might turn on me, and he soon did, calling me ‘Miss Prim’ and ‘Miss Powell’ and taking the mickey out of my clothes and accent.
    • If you haven't seen the show you may not know the attitude, so I should point out that the whole thing is taking the mickey out of the reporting methods of the major news channels, with a fair bit of commentary.
    • It's a joke; you fool about; they take the mickey out of you and it's fun.
    • The other lads took the mickey out of me because I spent my 21st birthday on patrol.
    • My fiancée's mother works at police headquarters and she has been taking the mickey out of me.
    • My family and most of my friends have been taking the mickey, but it is only because they don't know enough about the sport.