Traducción de open-door en Español:

open-door

de puertas abiertas, adj.

Pronunciación /ˌəʊp(ə)nˈdɔː/

adjetivo

  • 1

    (policy) (on immigration) de puertas abiertas
    (policy) (on imports) no proteccionista
    • Bolton is a town which has long absorbed different cultures, largely quite happily, with an open-door policy that has allowed many races to settle here.
    • If members doubt me, they go back to where I came from, the UK, and look at how it is straining at the seams all over the place as a result of having an open-door immigration policy.
    • Unlike the doctor, the mainstream don't regard all asylum seekers as paragons of virtue, or welcome an open-door immigration policy for all those who fancy living here.
    • The key question is this: does Ms Adams and those who think like her believe that this country should have an open-door policy, or does she believe there should be controlled immigration based on a quota system?
    • Some major employers are advocating a more open-door immigration and refugee policy in order to obtain new sources of labour, particularly in technology industries.
    • But higher wages and unionized labor are, ironically, part of the agenda for the very immigration support groups that join with business interests in keeping an open-door policy.
    • There is no open-door immigration policy in this country, and the member knows that.
    • It simply does not know how to overcome the problems it has created by its irresponsible open-door immigration policy.
    • However, he is not in favour of an open-door policy towards immigrant workers.
    • The minister said it was difficult to make estimates but the impression had been given that Ireland was the only country with an open-door policy.
    • Indeed, between 1769 and 1875 the country had an open-door immigration policy.
    • Outlining the proposals, Justice Minister Michael McDowell said he has been contacted by the heads of Dublin's maternity hospitals about the pressures the open-door citizenship policy was placing on services.
    • New Zealand First members copped all the abuse when we highlighted the dangers of this Government's soft touch on open-door immigration policies.
    • Because of limited resources, the open-door immigration policy has been hotly debated among education practitioners, politicians, and taxpayers.
    • The Immigration Acts of 1921 and 1924 reversed the open-door policy of immigration and established quotas.
    • I am not in favour of an open-door policy which would allow work permits to anyone who comes into the country.