Hay 2 traducciones principales de reform en Español

: reform1Reform2

reform1

reforma, n.

Pronunciación /rɪˈfɔːm//rəˈfɔrm/

nombre

  • 1

    (of system)
    reforma femenino
    before noun reform law ley reformadora / de reforma femenino
    • reform movement movimiento de reforma
    • I am generally in favor of orienting the country toward market reforms, but China's development must be more equal, more balanced.
    • Despite some tough reforms, no one is able to guess at the cost of widespread military corruption and incompetence.
    • To rise to these global challenges we have this week announced the next stage in our competitiveness reforms.
    • Most of the air security reforms Robert Poole recommends are intelligent and well taken.
    • Do you believe that constitutional reform is needed to rectify the situation?
    • Mr Prescott also used today's speech to announce sweeping housing reforms to tackle rogue landlords and reform the right to buy.
    • In this case constitutional reform or more representative institutions are undesirable, since they are as likely to impede as to accelerate modernisation.
    • For example, it has linked economic reform and structural adjustment to what it has termed good governance.
    • He always presented reforms as a necessary evil.
    • In thinking about reforms, it is important to have a sense of the problems we aim to address, and some possible ways of addressing them.
    • President Fox told reporters in Brazil that Mexico wants the United States to introduce immigration reforms as quickly as possible.
    • Why not postpone the constitutional debate for a decade and concentrate on economic reform?
    • If we want continued economic success we must continue the process of economic reform.
    • I want many changes though, starting with further reforms to agricultural policy, an end to secrecy, and a curb on the centralising tendency of the institutions in Brussels.
    • The process of economic reform had inevitably increased individual autonomy.
    • Arguably its most radical commitment was to constitutional reform.
    • Trying to keep the ailing system going another generation will wind up costing taxpayers far, far more than making reforms today.
    • But all reforms so far discussed can only make things worse.
    • So the developing countries, the main beneficiaries of US largesse, are digging in against other UN reforms unless they get the extra cash.
    • Sugar beet growers in Yorkshire were urged yesterday to lobby their MPs in a bid to water down reforms that could put thousands of jobs in the UK at risk.
  • 2

    (in character)
    reforma femenino
    he was beyond all hope of reform no había la menor esperanza de que se reformara

verbo transitivo

  • 1

    (institution/system) reformar
    • And it will continue to fail until Congress fundamentally reforms the law.
    • Our aim is to reform our institutions and develop them into excellent ones.
    • As Mr Pope rightly says, it's time the eccentric and discriminatory system was radically reformed.
    • Patrick Mulvaney mentions some excellent ways of reforming US elections.
    • The system had to be radically reformed to detect murder, medical error and neglect.
    • She set out to reform the economy which she did with great success.
    • This is the backdrop against which we consider reforming Canada's political institutions for the twenty-first century.
    • Does he not know that the CAP has just been drastically reformed?
    • So I don't think you can reform educational institutions in radical ways, except in the wake of a revolution.
    • The government's plan to reform the subsidy system is running into fierce opposition.
    • What about reforming religious institutions?
    • Its aim was to help such countries to acquire technology and sustainability by reforming their institutions and improving their competitiveness.
    • By the time McLeish was 24, local government was being radically reformed.
    • There can be absolutely no excuse for the government to avoid reforming these corrupt institutions.
    • A Westcliff security company has embarked on a campaign to reform working practices in the security business.
    • He called for proper funding to be put in place for hospitals, schools and local services but felt that a great opportunity to reform local government had been lost.
    • Before the Findlay decision was given in Strasbourg, the British government had in fact sought and obtained legislation in Parliament to reform the court martial system.
    • There was no real attempt to fundamentally reform or abandon the central planning process itself.
    • Consequently, reforming institutions of the federal government to accommodate western concerns may indeed help cure this problem.
    • This means not only refurbishing existing institutions, reforming committees and the like, but building new political sites.
  • 2

    (morally)
    reformar
    • And the Grinch is so much fun when he's bad, it's something of a disappointment when he reforms, realising along with the rest of Whoville that Christmas is about more than spending money.
    • I do not believe in the criminal's ability to reform, or their ability to name negative life factors as being a contributory factor to their crime.
    • In the end he reforms, because - to put it in Madonna terms - ‘efforts are made.’
    • The death row inmate says that he's reformed and his supporters believe he deserves clemency.

verbo intransitivo

  • 1

    reformarse

Hay 2 traducciones principales de reform en Español

: reform1Reform2

Reform2

reformista, adj.

Pronunciación /rɪˈfɔːm//rəˈfɔrm/

adjetivo

  • 1

    (rabbi/synagogue) reformista