Traducción de ship-to-shore en Español:

ship-to-shore

de barco a tierra, adj.

Pronunciación ///ˈˌʃɪp tə ˈʃɔ(ə)r/

adjetivo

  • 1

    (radio/link/telephone) de barco a tierra
    • Part of the DSC-equipped marine operator ship-to-shore system is operating, with work proceeding on the remainder.
    • As Marconi carried out his experiments in the mid 1890s, Capt Henry Jackson was following a parallel course in Britain, experimenting with ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore signals.
    • The suites are as good as anything in a five-star hotel - with huge beds, full-sized baths and walk-in dressing-rooms (plus every conceivable gadget, from DVD players to ship-to-shore telephones).
    • After checking out with strike and trying to check in with area control, I went through the ship-to-shore checklist and settled in for a 120-mile bingo.
    • On July 28th, 1899, while Marconi was testing his ship-to-shore radio in the English Channel, Tesla was in his lab in Colorado Springs tuning his equipment.
    • Changes in satellite technology - part of a larger revolution in ship-to-shore communications - have allowed cruise ships to supply internet access on a universal basis.
    • With the dive boat, of course, came the need for ship-to-shore communications.
    • I completed the ship-to-shore checklist, designated the North Island waypoint to get a five-to-six-degree, nose-down reference, then started down at 60 miles.
    • So I guess even if there was a ship-to-shore phone, you couldn't call the brother in question to get your car…
    • The Navy delivered supplies in ship-to-shore operations that eliminated the need to use damaged or overcrowded airfields.
    • An environmental report into the proposal, part of the Environmental Protection Authority's public review process, states air-to-ground and ship-to-shore bombing will occur on the site.
    • In 1899, a rival newspaper attempted to jam the New York Herald's ship-to-shore reporting of the America's Cup race results.
    • Extensive training is also conducted in helicopter underslung work, a critical function for forward resupply, ship-to-shore and remote operations.
    • U.S. amphibious doctrine puts a great deal of emphasis on the organization of the ship-to-shore movement of the assault landing force.