Translation of abide in Spanish:

abide

tolerar, v.

Pronunciation /əˈbʌɪd//əˈbaɪd/

transitive verb

  • 1

    tolerar
    soportar
    I can't abide her no la puedo ver
    • What they cannot abide is the suggestion that it was fought on a lie.
    • At the same time, he couldn't abide facile equations between criminal desperadoes and the legalized murder machinery of a state.
    • Since we'd done a fair amount of sinning together, her efforts came across to me as hypocrisy and I cannot abide a hypocrite.
    • She left out the glacé cherries because she couldn't abide the sticky things, substituting dates, which she loved.
    • I have severe asthma and cannot abide the smoke on most cruise ships.
    • ‘God cannot abide sin,’ he explains guilelessly to Read.
    • Just as nature abhors a vacuum, the city cannot abide a void.
    • Nothing satisfies these people, because now they cannot abide clarity in anyone but themselves.
    • Every totalitarian regime makes war on religion precisely because it cannot abide any god besides itself.
    • As ever, his arrogance and ignorance grated on everyone who cannot abide him, and left those who adore him in raptures.
    • But then, when Jesus said that he must undergo suffering and death, Peter simply couldn't abide it.
    • The man who had hoped to segue from comedy returned to the role he hated and the director he couldn't abide.
    • And I cannot abide the two-party system, so I'll be voting Lib Dem.
    • Charlie's a good man, yessir, who can't abide cheating at cards.
    • I can't abide lies from people I love.
    • But by nature, Kirstie couldn't abide things ‘hanging in the air’, as it were.
    • Yet we're sent on team-building conferences where the person we cannot abide appoints themselves as leader.
    • Her mother said that she couldn't abide Eliza's ‘negativity.’
    • For years Papa operated with a plain desk, which he and Mother shared, but she couldn't stand his clutter and he couldn't abide having his clutter ‘straightened up.’
    • Because they are miserable themselves, they cannot abide the happiness of others.

intransitive verb

archaic, literary

  • 1

    (to stay) permanecer
    (to dwell) morar literary
    • A central tenet of Shintoism is the concept of kami, spirits that abide in and are worshipped at shrines, representing human beings and things found in nature.
    • You did not read books through; you dwelt, abided between their lines and reopening them after an interval.
    • The Elder says, ‘Those who abide in love abide in God, and God abides in them’.
    • Where does the consciousness abide before it takes rebirth or becomes liberated?
    • When harmony persists in the home, harmony abides in the community, and harmony exists in the country.