Translation of avalanche in Spanish:


alud, n.

Pronunciation /ˈavəlɑːnʃ//ˈævəˌlæn(t)ʃ/


  • 1

    alud masculine
    avalancha feminine
    • Figure 2 shows a mass erosional feature that we interpret as a rockslide, or rock avalanche.
    • Only on a mountain can you experience avalanches of snow or rock.
    • On their descent they were hit by a huge avalanche of massive rocks of snow.
    • Yes, there are large rock avalanches that accompany volcanoes and they can travel a long way.
    • Then, way up on the mountain, a little avalanche fell.
    • Again we notice the ragged effect of massive snow avalanches.
    • Sporadic systems are those that produce avalanches, earthquakes, mudslides, volcanic eruptions and such like.
    • The team confirms that the slide was the result of a snow avalanche from a ridge top, which triggered both a flood and debris flow.
    • The blast caused an avalanche of rocks and dust, definitely stopping the pursuit.
    • Find a simple wind that sails your mind and body to Denver, Colorado; don't even think about the avalanches of mountain snow.
    • There have been reports where this dog will change direction or position for no apparent reason, seconds before an avalanche of ice and snow come hurtling down a mountainside.
    • The word avalanche is derived from a Swiss word meaning ‘descent to the valley’, and it can refer to snow, ice, rock or rubble.
    • Red light carved vast craters in the mountainside, and avalanches thundered down the sheer sides.
    • The entire northern flank of the mountain collapses and falls as an avalanche lowering the height of the mountain by 1,500 feet.
    • During interglacial periods the steep, unstable U-shaped valley sides are subject to mass movements such as rock falls and large rock avalanches.
    • An avalanche roaring down a mountainside may seem to be wildly out of control, but actually it is governed by certain equations.
    • Although the frequency of avalanches is smaller in comparison to the Alps, the plants are still exposed to heavy snow and avalanches.
    • On 1 January 1992, the day on which I survived falling into a crevasse and being almost buried in an avalanche, my tears had fallen onto the rocks and snow.
    • Meanwhile, several snow avalanches across northern Pakistan have killed more than 80 people.
    • First, most snow avalanches, other than extremely small ones, are violent affairs that snap bones and slam people into trees and rocks like a nightmare whitewater ride.