There are 2 main translations of beaver in Spanish

: beaver1beaver2

beaver1

castor, n.

Pronunciation /ˈbiːvə//ˈbivər/

noun

  • 1

    Zoology
    castor masculine
    to be an eager beaver ser muy entusiasta y trabajador
    • to work like a beaver trabajar como una hormiguita
    • Modern beavers are found in North America, northern Europe, and northern Asia.
    • So-called open-root teeth are common to animals that gnaw, such as beavers.
    • Sycamores naturally grow in river bottoms, and beavers use the young trees for dams and houses.
    • Harvested and driven from its habitat until it disappeared from much of the northeastern U.S., the beaver is now making such a strong comeback that it is becoming a nuisance in some areas.
    • Living members of the group today include beavers, squirrels, guinea pigs, rats, mice, capybaras, and hundreds of other species, said Sánchez-Villagra.
    • One of the favorite targets of the trappers in North America was the beaver, the largest of the North American rodents.
    • At the Farmington River we found several trees that were gnawed on by the beavers.
    • This slow-moving creature is Canada's largest rodent next to the beaver.
    • There was no mention made of the fact that the beaver is a native North American species whereas the cherry trees are exotics, imported from Japan.
    • Other animals that may carry and transmit the disease include beavers, muskrats, water and field voles, water and wood rats, squirrels, and lemmings.
    • Here on the U.S.-Canadian border along the Saint Lawrence River, I have been observing six beaver colonies this winter, and beavers from five of them have been out frequently to harvest trees and brush.
    • I was investigating the impact of beavers in a forest in Slitere National Park in northern Latvia.
    • Yes, beavers are industrious rodents whose dams help our river systems.
    • The Rodentia also includes beavers, muskrats, porcupines, woodchucks, chipmunks, squirrels, prairie dogs, marmots, chinchillas, voles, lemmings, and many others.
    • Birdwatchers and wildlife aficionados may see hawks, white-tailed deer, moose, black bears, martens, red squirrels and beavers, and, if very lucky, catch a glimpse of timber wolves.
    • Some of these destructive species include beavers, muskrats, elk, deer, voles, marmots, prairie dogs and geese.
    • For all the interest in leopards, Waser thinks philopatry may turn out to be more common in species such as beavers, wood rats and kangaroo rats-animals in which females make large investments in their ranges.
    • The bear, wolf, coyote, fisher, wolverine, otter, and lynx prey upon the beaver who is, nevertheless, a powerful antagonist when at bay.
    • Canada geese, muskrats, groundhogs, beavers, and various bird species may cause nuisance problems in and around the pond.
    • Although the beaver's industrious habits, wholesome diet, and generally meritorious lifestyle have endeared it to many human beings, the fact remains that beavers are also prized for their flesh, and are eaten.
  • 2

    (fur)
    piel de castor feminine
    • The greatest reward went to the post master who received one shilling for each score of beaver or an amount of furs of the same value.
    • Also on the program that night were the Marshall Dancers from the Lower Yukon, dressed in sumptuous headdresses that were trimmed with wolf and beaver fur.
    • Defence chiefs decided to stop making the busbies worn by the King's Troop from beaver fur several years ago, after protests that the animal was in danger of becoming extinct.
    • There is beaver or printed silver for fur trim used with leather for collars, sleeves and belts.
    • ‘I've got a little booklet from there that gives you three different recipes for beavers, and has a picture of a dolly bird draped in beaver furs,’ he added.
    • Her coffin was lovingly wrapped in muskrat, beaver and fox furs and lowered into the ground by her family.
    • From the early French fur traders of the 17th century to the early trading posts established by the Hudson's Bay Company, fur, and more specifically beaver pelts, were a source of income and fortune for early settlers.
    • There were six different furs to choose from including brown and grey Persian lamb, and beaver.
    • The first exploration of Canada's interior was for the purpose of finding beaver pelts to satisfy the obsession with fur coats by the European elite.
    • These ethnic artefacts use interesting materials such as beaver fur, moose hide and deer toes.
    • A ninth generation Early, Charles, who masterminded the move to Sedbergh, said the Indians used to equate the brightly coloured blankets' value to how many beaver skins they were worth.
    • He handed the Huronian Native the promised items and received the soft beaver pelts, placing them with the rest from that day.
    • The 1925 Hudson's Bay Point blanket's short indigo stitch lines, or ‘points,’ indicate how many beaver pelts it once traded for.
    • In the slap of waves against the rocky shore one can imagine hearing phantom brigades moving across the lakes, paddling in close line astern, their canoes piled high with beaver pelts destined for Bond Street and the rue de Rivoli.
    • It was once extremely abundant throughout most of the continent but went into decline as early as 1638, mainly because the great insulating qualities of beaver fur made it the best material for hat manufacture.
    • Exceptions to this rule are dark sheared faux furs, such as black sheared beaver and longhaired Mongolian lamb; cut these with the pile running upward.
    • The biggest difference was that New Netherland and its port town were together principally a trading colony, buying beaver and other fur skins from the Indians to sell at a profit in Europe.
    • These skins - especially beaver - were quite valuable and used in the Eastern states and in Europe for top hats, coats and other expensive clothing.

There are 2 main translations of beaver in Spanish

: beaver1beaver2

beaver2

Pronunciation /ˈbiːvə//ˈbivər/

noun

US
slang