Translation of blizzard in Spanish:

blizzard

ventisca, n.

Pronunciation /ˈblɪzəd//ˈblɪzərd/

noun

  • 1

    ventisca feminine
    tormenta de nieve feminine
    • Small trees would be cut down to mark the spot because of the severe winter with its blizzards and bad weather.
    • In the 1980's, after more than 100 wind turbines were set up across the state, none of them survived blizzards with winds blowing at 130 kilometers an hour.
    • In the winter, blizzards and ice storms strike all the way down into Texas.
    • In all it was a beautiful quiet day and definitely not a blizzard, just a snowstorm.
    • In addition, high winds accompanying blizzards have pushed snow through grills and into buildings' ductwork.
    • In my years, I have witnessed, first hand, tornadoes, blizzards, nor'easters, drought, ice storms, lighting, flood and rain.
    • The blizzard winds had come in much sooner than they normally did and he and the maids had been stuck in the compound for three weeks.
    • The illustrated book covers 70 years of Yorkshire's gales, blizzards, tornados and droughts.
    • Since that first winter, I've been through two ice storms and blizzards, as well as ‘normal’ winters, and frankly, I hate them.
    • The heavy blizzards can be so severe and the snowdrifts have been known to reach the roof.
    • In some places, the blizzard winds had blown their path clear of snow.
    • In many natural disasters, be it a blizzard, tornado or hurricane, the power is sometimes the first utility that fails.
    • If you lose electric power during a blizzard or ice storm, you probably will lose your heat.
    • Unpredictable summer storms, floods, and other water accompanied disasters such as hurricanes, blizzards, and tornados are some more reasons for water damage.
    • Much of the year I worry about my northern friends, with their blizzards, tornadoes, heat waves, droughts.
    • And then there are the weather warnings for hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, floods, winds, and tides.
    • Meteorologists have long known that extreme weather phenomena - blizzards, hurricanes, drought, and the like - coincide with these cycles.
    • Many of the famous blizzards and northeasters that battered the East Coast and sank ships in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean throughout history were bomb cyclones.
    • Winds are strong and frequent, and hurricanes and blizzards are common.
    • The blizzard became severe on the afternoon of the 25th.