Translation of bone in Spanish:

bone

hueso, n.

Pronunciation /bəʊn//boʊn/

noun

  • 1

    Anatomy
    hueso masculine
    this is too much for my poor old bones yo ya no estoy para estos trotes
    • When the eardrum vibrates, tiny bones within the middle ear transmit the sound signals to the inner ear.
    • In this condition, the spinal cord and the bones of the spinal column may fail to develop normally.
    • They tried to give her a bone marrow transplant but her bones rejected every bone tissue that was given to her.
    • Years ago we realized that if we combined all our accidents, there was hardly a bone in the human skeleton we hadn't broken.
    • In addition to the embryos and eye, the fossil find includes portions of a snout plus jawbones, skull bones, cheekbones, and teeth.
    • There are no fish bones in Norse archeological remains, Diamond concludes, for the simple reason that the Norse didn't eat fish.
    • The spinal cord is protected by bones stacked one upon the other.
    • The fact is, broken bones, or fractures, are common in childhood and often happen when kids are playing or participating in sports.
    • Direct injury to the spine may cause a bone fracture anywhere along your vertebral column.
    • Your spine is a long column of bones that stretch from the base of your skull to your tailbone.
    • Archaeologists have found the crushed remains of an amphora, a large ceramic jar, containing hundreds of fish bones.
    • Bone marrow is found in soft fatty tissue inside bones, where red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets are produced and developed.
    • The ligaments are tissues that connect the bones at the joints.
    • These lesions may affect any organ system but most commonly occur in the skin, mucous membranes, and bones.
    • It gets even smaller if the bone and tissue around it grow.
    • The spine is made up of many small bones called vertebrae.
    • Lifting weights strengthens the muscles, bones and connective tissue.
    • Weightlifting is known to strengthen tissue, including muscles, bones, ligaments, and tendons.
    • Bone marrow is a spongy tissue inside certain bones of the body that produces blood cells.
    • Xrays easily pick out surgical tools and hard tissues such as bones.
  • 2

    (of fish)
    espina feminine
  • 3bones plural

    (of dead person)
    restos masculine
    huesos masculine informal
    • Sighing, he pulled his weary bones to their feet and decided coffee was the best option.
    • A spirit then gradually materialized from the bones of the long dead corpse.
    • Now, more than ever before, the study of battles will involve a literal trampling upon dead men's bones.
    • A mile to the south, in the glen of the Allt nan Uamh, the bones of prehistoric man were found in a series of caves.
    • The post excavation procedure included the removal of all mud and adhering material from the bones and placing of the remains in a cabinet where they were allowed to dry out slowly.
    • The prefectural police told reporters the remains contained the bones of two persons.
    • I dragged my tired bones to the bathroom to shave.
    • In centuries past, graves would be exhumed, and any bones remaining would be collected and buried deeper down, thereby allowing fresh graves on top.
    • Rampaging Christian knights and soldiers remove the bones of St John Chrysostom and St Gregory Nazianzen.
    • Inside, an exhibition of pictures of mutilated corpses and glass cases containing the bones of the victims concludes with a visitors' book.
    • But I'd still like to dig up the bones of the man who condemned it, and bang them together so hard his ghost gets a migraine.
    • It includes remains such as Aboriginal bones, regarded as stolen goods by Aborigine communities in Australia today.
    • We are still unburying the bones, the remains, of the people who got killed.
    • Just ahead, in the wider section of the pass, the dried bones and carcasses of men and pack animals lay strewn about.
    • He lowered his aching bones to the floor after a harder day's work than he'd ever done.
  • 4

    (substance)
    hueso masculine
    • Some Yoruba woodcarvers also work in bone, ivory, and stone.
    • A stylish box made from bone and accented in brass – both exotic and elegant.
    • ‘Jacks date back to ancient Rome, when they were carved from ivory or bone,’ she says.
    • The material would be gradually replaced by healthy, newly grown bone and blood vessels.
    • Any suitable material may be used, including quill, parchment, wood, ivory, bone, horn, tortoiseshell, and plastic.
    • The spongy bone material was then used for DNA extraction.
    • Mining activity has been a constant source of bone and ivory artifacts over the last several decades.
    • The conservation of bone artefacts mainly concerns objects made of ivory, camel bone, elephant tusks and horn.
    • This involves the use of ivory, bone, and pieces of wood to create geometric patterns.
    • A cheaper and readily available material which is often passed off as ivory is bone.
    • Bears resorb their bone material during hibernation, but they constantly form new bone material as well.
    • My grandpa used to carry a big folding Stockman knife, with old fashioned bone handles and blades worn thin from sharpening.
    • What's more, treasured wood was decorated with bone, jade, gold, bronze and shells adding to the value.
    • Bones are made up of two types of material - compact bone and cancellous bone.
    • The caves at Creswell Crags are known to have been occupied in palaeolithic times because hunters left behind bone and flint stone tools.
    • My latest cut-down bone handled table knives have a near quadrant at the tip and cut unbelievably.
    • This canoe-style knife measures 3.75 inches long, and has bone handles.
    • Ornaments and utensils in precious metals, bronze, bone and horn had also been uncovered.
    • In contrast, fossilized bone is believed to be completely mineralized, meaning no organics are present.
    • The hilt was made of fine bone and ivory, carved into the shape of a dragon.
    • The earliest example of European poetry about a stranded whale is an Anglo-Saxon inscription on a whale bone casket of about 700 AD.
    • Chinese dominoes are longer than Western ones and are divided into two types and were originally carved from bone or ivory with the indented pips made of ebony.
    • However, in recent years he has turned his skill and artistry to the crafting of artefacts wrought from ancient native woods, bone, gold, bronze and steel.
    • ‘You have to be confident to be able to distinguish ivory from bone, and new ivory from old,’ said Mr Judson.
    • Fine details carved in boxwood, bone, ivory, brass and ebony.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (meat) deshuesar
    (fish) quitarle las espinas a
    • In recent years, although the name has almost disappeared, many butcher shops and supermarkets still sell boned shoulders of lamb complete with stuffing.
    • Unless you are a dab-hand with the boning knife, ask the butcher to bone the chicken legs for you.
    • Head butcher Paul Nicholson helped to choose the birds and bone the smaller ones before they could be stuffed inside the turkey.
    • Clean and bone the fish, leaving their heads in place.
    • It is then boned and the meat is allowed to ‘age’ or mature for up to 14 days.’
    • The school's culinary dean recalls being hung from a meat hook for improperly boning veal during one of his 14-hour days as an apprentice in 1949 Germany.
    • Have the turkey thighs boned and skinned at the meat market.
    • All biologists should eat kippers because it is quite impossible to bone one without thinking about development.