There are 4 main translations of bore in Spanish

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore1

hacer, v.

Pronunciation: /bɔr//bɔː/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (tunnel/shaft/well) hacer
    (shaft/tunnel/well) abrir
    they bored a hole into the rock hicieron una perforación en la roca
    • we bored our way through the crowd nos abrimos paso entre la muchedumbre
    • his eyes were boring a hole in me me traspasaba con la mirada

intransitive verb

  • 1

    perforar
    taladrar
    they are boring for oil/water están haciendo perforaciones en busca de petróleo/agua

noun

  • 1

    (diameter of cylinder, pipe, gun barrel)
    calibre masculine
    small-bore weapons armas de pequeño calibre
    • 12-bore shotgun escopeta de calibre 12
    • Quite simply, the film is a bore.
    • At a deeper level, it seems to me that he is a world-class crashing bore.
    • But life itself becomes a bore, a drudge, a grind.
    • I've already lost the will to live, so taking out a few geeky bores really won't trouble me one bit.
    • It's like reading the same book over and over again: it becomes a bore.
    • Too bad attending them can be a complete and utter bore.
    • But she became too demanding and, if never a bore, tedious and peremptory in her behaviour.
    • Give him a gun and a hot little sports car, and he's a bore just the same.
    • With all of the reality shows that make TV watching a complete bore, I was glad to finally see something new, fresh, absorbing and entertaining.
    • Sure, he's likable, but he's a bore.
    • When there, I risked being a real bore by showing some Bowie video clips while we ate and got through two bottles of appallingly horrible wine.
    • Will's columns can sometimes be a bore, ripping a social healthcare program here and our educational system's shortcomings there.
    • Robert Crumb he isn't, but that's too bad because watching this obnoxious bore becomes tedious long before the film's 77 minutes run out.
    • Levels are well planned out, and the fighting, which can sometimes be a bore, is one of the best things about this game.
    • Monotony soon becomes a bore to anyone, so the music teacher should guard against the class period becoming mere routine.
    • Instead, it's a tedious and meretricious bore, and those are the worst kind.
    • Those who have a nice car and go to a club are usually a bore.
    • The woman who at first so impressed you now seems like a bore who won't let anyone else get a word in edgewise.
    • I think he has simply demonstrated once again why he has become such a crashing bore.
    • My enthusiasm was gone; everything became a bore, a chore, a nightmare.
    • That notion of filmmaking seemed like a bore then and seems like a bore now.
    • She on the other hand is a complete washout and a complete bore.
    • It seemed every woman he went out with was a dud, a bore or just plain stupid.
    • The film's main character, Mr. Hundert, might or might not be a great teacher (in any case, the film thinks he is), but he's a bore.
    • Earl is so enmeshed in his youngest son's identity that he becomes a bore.
    • The course can sometimes be a bore but I find the major subjects quite interesting.
    • I seem to have these spurts of wanting to update everything that's going on and then times when life seems like a bore or a little to overwhelming to update about.
    • The rest of the school day was a bore, so I won't bother going into detail about it.
    • At the risk of being a complete bore I feel a strong urge to recount our recent experience as a babysitting tag-team.
    • While in this day of $1 billion building buys, $60 million seems like a bore, this transaction is eye-catching for a couple of reasons.
    • It's a chore and a bore and it makes me sore not to mention poor!
    • She sings like a bore, acts like a bore, is a bore.
    • Yes, Matt can sometimes be a bore, but he usually knows when he is boring, and this lends complexity to his character as the series develops.
    • What is it about household work that makes people regard it as an utter bore?
    • You always were a headache and you always were a bore.
    • The days of desperately trying to escape the clutches of some crashing bore in the corner of a nightclub are long gone.
    • On the Shubenacadie River, the tidal bore and rapidly rising tide results in extremely turbulent waters.
    • The Severn Bore is one of Britain's few truly spectacular natural phenomena.
    • The longtime Brazilian bore aficionado achieved an unbelievable record of surfing non-stop for 10.1 km (6.3 miles) down Brazil's famous river bore wave, called the Pororoca.
    • The largest bores occur on 25 days a year, in the morning and evening, with biggest bores on tides over 32’.
    • Experiments in a laboratory wave tank show that interactions between bores refracted by a prowlike beach can produce jets in which the velocity is nearly twice the bore's phase speed.
    • The bore corresponds to a tidal wave that appears at the same time that the tide comes up.
    • Two years ago Christopher had a pallidotomy, where a hole was bored in his skull and brain cells were cauterised.
    • It was said that the train bored a hole in the mountain's stomach and rushed through it.
    • They ripped out the palace walls to lay electrical wiring, and they bored holes for the aerial cables.
    • Anything—a drill or any other digging tool—that is not secured by a strong anchor into the surface may just be pushed away before the drill actually bores a hole.
    • Unfortunately, the head was attached to his body, which as a unit had rented the apartment under hers and had bored a hole in the ceiling for stalking purposes.
    • It bored two drill holes within the licence area but some distance from the Rob Roy field, hoping to find oil which would have been in a new field, but without success.
    • A hole was bored through the shell of a large surf clam and a thick rope passed through it.
    • Pipis have to keep an eye out for Didymus, who wants to bore a hole in their shell using both an implement and some acid.
    • Just below it, an eight-inch hole was bored through the door and a ventilation fan installed.
    • He has a story for each tool he demonstrates, be it a drill that bores square holes or a spill plane.
    • It bores a hole through armor with so much energy, because it is so heavy, that it spews inside the tank or armored personnel carrier all kinds of bits and pieces of that armor in a ‘spalling’ or shotgun effect.
    • To give a more vivid demonstration of the accuracy of his painting, he bored a small hole in the panel with the baptistery painting at the vanishing point.
    • He was staring at a tree that the rock had bored a hole through.
    • A restoration company removed all the carpets in the single-story, ranch-style home, and holes were bored to dry out the walls.
    • It bored four holes from the top of the hill to its base to allow sensitive recording equipment to be lowered inside the mound to provide a 3D image of the hill.
    • In the cooler confectionery room Jay bored holes into oranges with a root-cutter.
    • Your teacher will now help you, by inventing some contraption of hot bits of coat-hanger wire, to bore deep holes up from the base of the candle.
    • Your theory is that it might have been a whistleblower on the staff who did not break and enter the premises, was lawfully on the premises, but bored a hole, which you say may or may not be a break and enter.
    • Feric adapted a drill so that it could bore two holes allowing the probe to seat.
    • I always thought it was like neutron star material—it would bore a hole completely through you if you got in contact with it.
  • 2

    (hole)
    barreno masculine
    agujero masculine

There are 4 main translations of bore in Spanish

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore2

pesado, n.

Pronunciation: /bɔr//bɔː/

noun

  • 1

    (dull person) pesado masculine informal
    (dull person) pesada feminine informal
    (dull person) pelmazo masculine informal
    (dull person) plomo masculine informal
    (dull thing) aburrimiento masculine
    (dull thing) pesadez feminine informal
    (dull thing) lata feminine informal
    you're being a bore! ¡mira que eres plomo / pesado!
  • 2British

    (annoying thing)
    what a bore your having to go so soon! ¡qué fastidio / qué lata que te tengas que ir tan pronto!

transitive verb

  • 1

    (weary)
    aburrir
    I'm not boring you, am I? no te estaré aburriendo, ¿no?
    • opera bores me stiff / rigid la ópera me aburre mortalmente / soberanamente
    • I'm bored stiff estoy más aburrida que una ostra
    • the lecture bored me to death / tears la conferencia fue aburridísima / me aburrió hasta decir basta

There are 4 main translations of bore in Spanish

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore3

macareo, n.

Pronunciation: /bɔr//bɔː/

noun

  • 1

    Geography
    (tidal wave)
    macareo masculine

There are 4 main translations of bore in Spanish

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore4

Pronunciation: /bɔr//bɔː/