There are 2 main translations of bust in Spanish

: bust1bust2

bust1

busto, n.

Pronunciation /bʌst//bəst/

noun

  • 1

    (sculpture)
    busto masculine
    • But I knew they existed, all right - and not just plaques and statues but even a bust in Westminster Abbey.
    • The bust was sculpted by internationally-renowned figurative artist Ian Walters.
    • Noble sentiment orchestrates the canvas, which was executed for the subject of the sculpted bust on the pedestal, Dr. Upton Scott.
    • One can discern in the mirror other objects in the room such an end table, a sculpted bust, an oil lamp, an oval portrait and a grandfather clock.
    • I was concentrating on a sculpted bust that had caught my eye, a familiar one, worked by a familiar hand.
    • More than 70 marble, bronze, terracotta and plaster busts and life-size sculptures are on display together for the first time in nearly two centuries.
    • Sculptures, moulds, busts, dentures, imprints and masks of Washington's face and body will be scanned with lasers.
    • Casters make commemorative or memorial busts and figures specially ordered and designed by clients.
    • He became, after Nollekens, the most successful sculptor of portrait busts in England.
    • The room was decorated with fine eighteenth century art, sculptures and busts of previous political figures.
    • Next she proceeds to the major works of art like sculpted statues and busts that have been identified as this woman and finally to a briefer look at minor artworks such as cameos.
    • Although he made some figures in his earlier idiom, his later sculptures were mainly portrait busts.
    • Now the sculptor who made the bust is working on a statue of Nelson Mandela based on that visit to Bedford.
    • Little is known of the obscure sculptor who executed the bust.
    • It was this picture that formed the basis for American sculptor Paul Granlund's busts of Ramanujan, created in 1987 for the Ramanujan Centennial Year.
    • The monumental bust, The Last Roman, looks on accusingly.
    • His architectural sculpture and terra-cotta portrait busts of leading citizens were much admired in their day.
    • The busts feel sculptural and classical; the painting seems like an homage to a monumental past.
    • The Brock Prize consists of $40,000 cash and a sculpted bust of Sequoyah, the only person known to have created an alphabet.
    • One is of a pair of figures from the shoulders up, looking at two sculpted busts that are, in shape and composition, an exact repetition of themselves.
  • 2

    (bosom)
    busto masculine
    pecho masculine
    she's a 36-inch bust tiene 90 de busto
    • But, I can't wear dresses with a deep V-neck or a seam under the bust because I have no chest!
    • Gabe sat up rigidly and attempted to help Sara through a frame that was about two sizes too small for someone with as impressive of a bust as her.
    • But the products are expected to be snapped up by even more women keen to increase the size of their bust.
    • It was a little big around the bust but looked rather nice on me.
    • ‘She's around here somewhere,’ he replied, looking over to a horribly dressed girl with a big bust.
    • From a lift in the bust to a trimmer behind, some of this plus size sexy lingerie is a work of art and most of the fabrics on today's market are truly effective and extremely comfortable.
    • We are all beautiful in our own way and don't even realise it, you don't have to be thin with big busts to make it in the world or even just to feel good.
    • Secondly, to get your correct cup measurement: With your bra on, measure loosely around the fullest part of your bust.
    • The beautiful actress had her bust size reduced from a massive 34DD to a 34D because she was sick of men leering over them.
    • I wasn't a fitness model, and I didn't have a big bust.
    • We may be dismayed that a 15-year-old feels her sense of worth rests on the size of her bust, but haven't 15-year-old girls always felt like this?
    • It's a particularly good shape to wear if you have a bigger bust.
    • It was a beautiful dress with a band of deep purple lining where the bust should end.
    • If your bust measurement is a full size larger or smaller than the pattern, blend the adjustment line from the waistline to the bustline of the next size.
    • She will not wear an outfit unless her bust is busting out and over, even in the dead of winter.
    • A note about the boys at our school, they like girls with big busts more than girls who don't have one at all.
    • The 19-year-old from Withington is waiting to finish university before having a bust enhancement.
    • For dresses, blouses, tops, vests, jackets and coats choose the pattern size by the bust or upper-bust measurement.
    • Due to increased bust and nipple size, I removed them at the end of my first trimester.
    • She finally chose a cheetah top that fit closely and showed off her small stomach and made her bust look bigger.

There are 2 main translations of bust in Spanish

: bust1bust2

bust2

romper, v.

Pronunciation /bʌst//bəst/

verb

  • 1informal

    (break)
    (window/machine) romper
    the door was locked, so we busted it open como la puerta estaba cerrada con llave, la abrimos a golpes
    • I fell, and broke my leg in two places, and completely busted my wrist.
    • Council house rents in Rotherham are to rise by an average of 5.5 per cent - an inflation busting increase on the heels of an 8.3 per cent rise last year.
    • Senior officers from across the authority have now been asked to find more than £3 million of savings to avoid busting the budget and redundancies are expected.
    • Reich can take some of the credit for busting the stranglehold on the 20th century of atonal music, which he calls a red herring; he describes listening to such work as akin to taking a bitter pill.
    • Their shows suck, their toys bust too easily and games nowadays just don't have the same imagination.
    • Then one night, a soldier busts my front door in, drunk from the victory parties.
    • A sport where the record busting efforts of yesteryear are now are much fewer and farther between, with more people running slower or even jumping or throwing less than they used to?
    • The bottle busted and up burst a huge puff of milky white smoke.
    • Already he's five ahead of where the Cardinals man was when he busted Babe Ruth's 34-year record.
    • They would need to bust the enemy lines wide open.
    • Only broken furniture, busted doorways, and bloodstains.
    • The new techniques combine the use of clot busting drugs with clot macerating devices to break up the clot in the leg.
    • For those who cannot afford the machines, Mr Saville recommended practical allergy busting solutions like vacuuming mattresses, pillow covers and sheets to kill the dust mites.
    • When this drug comes across a clot or a fat deposit it busts it clean away.
    • I've split my lip and busted my eyebrow, but luckily I haven't broken any bones.
    • One myth I would like to bust is that PR is a measure of a web site.
    • He didn't waste time trying to pick the lock, he busted the door in one burst of adrenalin.
    • An emphatic ‘no,’ we discover - busting a generic stereotype wide open.
    • At least once a week, Cory Schlesinger must have his face mask replaced because he either snaps the posts or busts the welds.
    • You skip around the back and quietly encourage the locks to take a break, while I bust the front door lock.
  • 2past tense, past participle busted
    slang

    (raid)
    (person) agarrar informal
    (person) trincar Spain informal
    (premises) hacer una redada en
    • Presumably the local sausage pusher whom they buy from keeps getting busted by the police for selling sausages to children, or something.
    • When police busted the home they found much of the operation had been taken down.
    • Inspector Minks, who busted him at an illegal rave for drugs possession, has other ideas.
    • They are undercover police officers trying to bust drug smugglers.
    • The police busted them for squatting within a fortnight.
    • The film is based on the story of a drug dealer, who's busted by the cops early in the film for having a couch full of illegal substances.
    • In August 2001, the Delhi Police busted an international illegal exchange in Jasola Vihar.
    • A couple of employees in the postal dept. have already been busted for taking out credit cards in student and faculty names.
    • Armed police have busted two drug houses just metres from two Bay school playgrounds - seizing 200 cannabis plants and making five arrests.
    • Do you want to be busted for drugs by a dog that isn't properly trained?
    • One third of Canadians arrested abroad were busted for drugs, making it the most commonly prosecuted offence.
    • This was an unusual investigation because most meth labs aren't busted by good police work.
    • She was later released, then arrested again (along with a dozen others) when police busted a house orgy a week later.
    • They had seen sketchy reports in that morning's newspapers of a musician being busted for possession of drugs.
    • Not testing is cheaper and easier than testing, and your athletes are much less likely to be busted for doping.
    • If he isn't, why do the police keep busting his home?
    • The site was apparently part of a organisation busted by police.
    • DEA agents sometimes pose as chemical salesmen in order to bust suspected ecstasy cooks.
    • He was busted for using fake checks to buy pizzas, but they knew if they could just identify him, he'd be good for a lot more crime across the country.
    • Remember when we got busted by the Park Ranger for putting our raft in the retention pond?
    • We have heard that the first clan-labs were busted by the police in about 1998.
    • McCloy's short, but fascinating piece documents the events of one fateful night when a gig is busted by the police.
    • On February 10, 2000, Montreal police busted the club.
    • Around that time, he was busted for possession of marijuana and spent two years in prison.
    • His parents cut him off financially when he told them he'd been busted for drugs.
    • He was busted for smuggling the stuff in January 2000.
    • It seems unbelievable to Shafer that there could be dozens of active stash houses without the police busting them all.
    • How much advance fee loan scams take in is not known - one London-based scheme that police busted last year may have netted millions over several years.
    • Immigration police last week busted an international drug ring operating out of Naklua, arresting five people, two Thais and three Malaysians.
    • He was on the run after Singapore police busted an earlier plot to bomb Western embassies there.
    • Back in 1996 we saw the first clandestine P laboratory busted by the police.
    • Whether the police actually busted the premises, remains unknown.
    • A few weeks ago, he was busted for possession of marijuana at school.
    • A few months ago, the cops busted an illegal numbers operation - the local Mafia's preferred racket these days - a few miles up the street from Vesuvio's.
    • The Club was busted by police in the early '80s, something which heralded its demise.
    • In December, 1999, Gaffney was busted for stealing some cash and a gold watch.
    • Employees at a morgue in India have been busted for allowing local traders to store fish (meant for consumption) in among their dead bodies.
    • A respected art dealer is busted for selling a Cheyenne war bonnet.
    • After watching seven performers perform, police busted a sex show in North Pattaya, arresting all seven performers and the venue's manager.
  • 3past tense, past participle busted
    US informal

    (bankrupt)
    dejar sin un centavo
    dejar sin blanca Spain
    dejar sin un quinto Mexico
  • 4past tense, past participle busted
    US informal

    (punch)
    darle un puñetazo a
    • He then pounded Eddie some more busting him open and left in the low rider.
    • I saw him literally bust one guy in half with shots to the body.
    • Talk then shifted to the big chair shot he took from Credible that busted him open pretty bad, leaving a big dent in his head.
    • I was so angry, I could have busted his knee cap, broken his jaw, and broken his arms, but I controlled myself.
    • He needs some nurturing as he got in a fight at work last night and now has a smashed nose and busted up lip.
    • It bothered him a great deal that I would want to be with Marcus more then him and he made it a game to taunt at me about my past until I didn't know whether to burst into tears or bust his nose.
    • His nose had dried blood all over it, and his lips were busted open.
    • He then began hitting himself, and busted himself open hardway.
    • Passport control officers entered the train, and immediately started busting the chops of everyone in our cabin.
    • Gabrielle felt tears of pain well up in her eyes as her lip was busted open.
    • Someone busted his forehead open with a car stereo; another rioter tried to slice his ear off.
    • Caleb twisted himself around once more and kicked Riley in the face, slipping open his lips and busting his nose, causing blood to spill forth from each orifice.
    • I don't remember sitting down. Unfortunately, my blankets protect me and I do not bust my head open on the bed post.
    • Maybe I busted my lip open last night when I collapsed on the floor.
  • 5past tense, past participle busted
    US slang

    (demote)
    degradar
    • He gets busted down to the ranks for accidentally winging a hostage.
    • That soldier had already been busted to El and was on the short list for an administrative discharge.
    • Billy has observed this and gets busted in rank for slugging Capt. Hanks at a formal ball one night.
    • Eastwood plays ex-Lieutenant Kelly, who was busted down to private as a scapegoat for a failed mission.
    • Now, even though no one was hurt, there was talk of busting him down to private.
    • First you go get yourself a silver star, then you get busted to private.

intransitive verb

informal

  • 1

    (machine/object) romperse
    (machine/object) estropearse
    (object/machine) sonar Southern Cone informal

noun

  • 1US

    (collapse)
    caída feminine
    descalabro masculine
    • More recently we have relied on consumer spending to prop up the economy during the bust.
    • It flames it, it makes the bigger booms and busts.
    • The bust remained a bust, and no amount of money magic could restart the boom.
    • Chinese authorities, however, believe that they can stage an orderly deflation of the bubble and thereby prevent an economic bust.
    • It's only common sense to pay off our debts before the next big bust.
    • As we explain on page 8, what has happened is a classic example of the boom to bust cycle built into capitalism.
    • We are not in recovery; it is nothing more than a little boom that ultimately will turn into a bigger bust.
    • Your correspondent is old enough to have actually participated in the economic booms and busts of the last 40 odd years, housing included.
    • And how bad would the tech bust have been if the bubble hadn't been so big?
    • Big bucks can make for a big bang, but they can all to easily lead to a big bust.
    • This pool of finance has over the years been increasingly funneled into speculative channels, fueling refashioned booms and busts around the globe.
    • Economic cycles follow a pattern; the most basic pattern is boom, bust, boom, bust.
    • On the other hand, the French and the Dutch probably haven't done done us Yanks any big favor, since the eventual bust is likely to be proportional to the size of the bubble.
    • Likewise recessions or economic busts are set in motion if people suddenly change their psychology and stop spending.
    • Consequently, this leads to a fall in real output, i.e., to an economic bust.
    • But as some economists have pointed out: the longer the boom, the bigger the bust.
    • From Bangkok to Boston, it is under close global focus as pundits search for signs of the next big bust.
    • And the bust is a period of stagnation and destruction.
    • It is a cynical camouflage for problems caused by the boom and bust rhythm of capitalism, and the bosses' insistence that profits come before people.
    • Cold Wars, Hot Wars, economic booms and busts, the rapacious scramble for resources: we hear the warnings of countries, the shouts of other countries in greedy triumph.
  • 2slang

    (raid)
    redada feminine
    • She says immigrant women would be reluctant to trust an agency that accompanies police on busts.
    • The current rash of raids and busts on bars that showcase objectionable entertainment is making some of our tourists itch.
    • During the bust, police seized three kilograms of cocaine having an estimated street value of $255,000.
    • He was also usually the one who got in the police's way when they were trying to make a bust.
    • Police have arrested an alleged key member of a drug syndicate after the biggest cocaine bust in Hong Kong's history.
    • Another scene shows how that balance can be thrown off by a surprise police bust.
    • The bust was made after police received a tip from the public.
    • ‘The five tons of cocaine seized in this operation is one of the largest busts in the police history,’ Pardew said.
    • There have also been big busts, however, in Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Malawi, Nigeria and Tanzania.
    • In the ensuing media fracas, McAvoy's bust has rivalled Jordan's for the number of column inches generated.
    • If the big guy isn't caught, the bust does very little to end his drug operation.
    • In addition to last April's bust, Hengchun police said last summer they also arrested drug users at Baishawan, a secluded beach they believe to be a favorite spot for ecstasy users.
    • When the day's bust is complete, police have arrested three men in front of Sun Pay.
    • When a cornered drug dealer aims his pistol at the officers during a bust, they return fire, killing him instantly.
    • A suspected drug dealer was arrested during a dawn raid on his house, the latest in a series of weekly busts by Merton police.
    • Three senior Victorian drug squad detectives and one of their wives, also a police officer, allegedly used money confiscated during heroin busts to fund the purchase of cars, boats, property and cattle.
    • And isn't it true that some of the biggest busts have related to people who exchanged this type of material via email or through websites?
    • How to fight back against a bad bust or police harassment was something that he and fellow musicians had been discussing for years.
    • The Tasty Bust Reunion also features ten years since the famous police bust in Melbourne.
    • The police bust that scuppered the alleged plans followed a tip-off from a member of the public at about 8pm on Monday.

adjective

  • 1

    • 1.1informal (bankrupt)

      to go bust ir(se) a la bancarrota
      • Most major accountancy firms believe any SPL club consistently paying more than 60% of turnover on wages run the risk of going bust.
      • But even success-only fee lawyers will find it difficult to act for a bust business.
      • I think New York has so many tunnels due to a subway craze at the turn of the century and when the bubble burst and the companies went bust the tunnels got sealed off.
      • Louise struggles with the car door before remembering about the bust lock, before remembering about leaving the door open.
      • So why is California, with its $1.3 trillion economy, going bust?
      • She started me, I jumped up, I got one of my dizzy spells, and she gave me a bust lip and probably a black eye.
      • It's a pretty unpleasant experience when a company you've invested in goes bust and you lose your entire investment.
      • The company went bust with 30,000 people losing their jobs and £40 million of debt.
      • The inflated value of the peso helped maintain an illusion of prosperity long after the economic boom had gone bust.
      • A couple of the white guys had black eyes or a bust lip.
      • Blood spurted out of his bust lip, and Jameson lifted his finger to it.
      • Her face was bleeding with a bust lip and swollen eye.
      • If you want to replace busted Volvo lights, service tool kit can help you do the job without a fuss.
      • Only there were no-one else around, just Michael and me, and poor ole Pete on the floor nursing a bust lip.
      • But then again how many businesses are going bust right now because they can't get the right people because they can't face the commute?
      • It's rare that an airline will go bust overnight, but it's still a good idea to know your options.
      • Liverpool went bust because its economy depended on the docks, and it was on the wrong side of the country for trade with Europe.
      • That meant big firms going bust, others scrapping investment plans, and others consolidating their operations in their countries of origin.
      • The directors of a bust Hampshire dealership have been charged with supplying counterfeit software to more than half of the UK's police forces.
      • The wakeful partner looks as if she was constructed piecemeal, again with a bust pendant from her broad shoulders.
      • It's the fact that the heady rush of patriotism helps mask the hangover of a bubble economy gone bust.
      • Many companies have gone bust because they have failed to do so.
      • The survey revealed firms in Scotland are nearly half as likely to go bust than their English counterparts.
      • After all what is the value of a bust recruitment company with no contracts?
      • It's about being stuck in the sticks with a bust radio, a girl called Megan and some wolfy things in the woodshed.
      • If the Government hadn't reversed some of the Bacon measures in the Budget, building firms would have gone bust by now.
      • This, incidentally, is also the case if you do a ‘repair’ to fix a bust system - not exactly friendly.
      • Even the bust radio and lost radar bleeps sinking in the fluid can't pull it from its descent into something wetter than electronics.
      • With one punch I was on the floor with a bust nose.
      • However, all lenders are ranked before shareholders so if a company does go bust it is rare for shareholders to get much money back.
      • The technology and computer sector recorded 27 failures, while 27 bars, restaurants and food outlets also went bust during the period.
      • If police forces were to go bust, Lancashire would be one of them.

    • 1.2

      anything higher than a six and I'm bust si me toca una carta más alta que seis me paso / me voy
      • it's a gold medal or bust o la medalla de oro o nada

  • 2British

    (broken)
    busted