There are 2 main translations of canon in Spanish

: canon1canon2

canon1

canon, n.

Pronunciation /ˈkanən//ˈkænən/

noun

  • 1

    • 1.1(church decree)

      canon masculine
      • Ironically, the monks, who are excluded from politics by both legal laws and religious canons, are probably among the most crucial actors in local elections.
      • The turning point probably came when the General Convention revised the canon on divorce and remarriage.
      • They, not the canons and decrees of the Council of Trent, or even the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, were the true legacy of early modern Catholicism for the modern age.
      • Charlemagne encouraged the general adoption of the liturgical books used in Rome, as well as the so-called Dionisyo-Hadriana, the main Roman collection of conciliary canons and papal decrees.
      • Here, as elsewhere, Coriden notes the tension between the roots of the canons in Roman law and a more recent desire to highlight their connection to the imperatives of the gospel life.

    • 1.2formal (standard, criterion)

      canon masculine
      • All this is described without inspiration and in a purely conventional manner, so it must be interpreted by the canons of the apocalyptic style.
      • One example would be his last testament in court, in which he repeatedly accuses Gandhi of flouting the canons of secular statecraft.
      • Collectors of modern art flaunted the canons of conventional taste, incurring ridicule and criticism and, although some of them were known to one another, many collected in isolation.
      • Yet the treatment of the subject is perfectly in keeping with the canons of Neoclassicism, with its theatrical grouping of figures, idealised faces, its emphasis on drawing rather than colour and with its smooth and glossy paint surface.
      • These images have a grainy and rough appearance that pulls them even further away from the canons of early modernist photography as defined by Ansel Adams and Edward Weston.
      • This is perfectly valid and appropriate advice from the vantage point of the canons of structured interviewing with its quest for standardization and for valid and reliable data.
      • These were the canons of Socialist Realism enforced in Stalinist Eastern Europe, as late as my visit in 1967 to Weimar, one of the most decorative of cities.
      • The pressure to conform to the canons of popular taste - or rather lack of taste - has never been stronger.
      • The canons of journalistic ethics compel me to make this information available to you, the reader.
      • Latourette's narrative sought to follow the canons of good history - retelling the story on the basis of good evidence.
      • All they have is administrative fiat which fails any of the canons of the rule of law.
      • Traditional religious beliefs that are paranormal, that is, that violate the canons of scientific causality, exhibit a negative correlation with education and scientific knowledge.
      • At the same time, the canons of social scientific research, in particular a nervousness about appearing to make value judgements, have a significant influence on the form of argumentation.
      • Sometimes, to be sure, one bias or another leads to a violation of the canons of scientific method.
      • Pacheco's pictures no longer follow the canons of Mannerism, but neither do they embrace the naturalism that dominated Spanish painting in the first third of the 17th century.
      • What this is about is affording privileged protection under law to categories of people favoured by the canons of political correctness.
      • Studies of geographical correlation have low status within the canons of evidence based medicine.
      • By the canons of classical taste, they were gaudy.
      • Rodinson wrote to unveil the secrets of a world dimly understood by Europeans, Derrida to expose the hidden contradictions and incoherencies of what seemed most transparent about the canons of Western thought.
      • The relationship with outsider art persists, however, because of the obsessiveness of his work and its disregard for the canons of Western figuration.

  • 2

    (body of works)
    conjunto de obras de un autor consideradas auténticas
    the Protestant canon el canon protestante
    • the Canon (of the mass) el Canon (de la misa)
    • Over these same three decades he built up his own canon of literary work that has qualified him as one of the most important writers of our era.
    • Both Jews and Christians read the biblical writings in a canon.
    • Fragments of every book of the Hebrew canon have been discovered except for the book of Esther.
    • Some professors are also dedicated to the ‘canon’ and cannot figure out how to get that canon taught if not by lecture - the way they learned.
    • It is possible that Walker, trained in the traditional canon at Sarah Lawrence, may be directly alluding to Shelley's line.
    • The emergence of Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Esther and Judith, and Tobit during this period allows him to present the differences between components in the eventual Jewish canon and various Christian canons.
    • The canon of his prose writings long included De Doctrina Christiana, an unorthodox theological treatise first printed in 1825.
    • African American culture, heritage, and the need to pay homage to it also provide direction for Thomas's fictional canon, which to date includes six novels.
    • It might be that the easiest way to explain why a movie doesn't work is to compare it to one that does, which is why I bring up the cinematic canon of Christopher Guest and his repertory company.
    • When you read passages attributed to Satan in the Gospels for example, and you read passages attributed to Mara in the Buddhist canon, you suddenly hear this same voice.
    • And ultimately, perhaps we may need to be even more careful about ever implying that it is on the basis of an association with the maternal realm that women writers belong in modernist or feminist literary canons.
    • His legacy to the literary canon is his portrayal of the people, language and customs of the English countryside in his novels.
    • General readers wishing for fresh insight into the hermeneutical significance of the biblical canon are advised to look elsewhere.
    • He is not the only actor to impersonate a butler in the Wodehouse canon.
    • Many Baptists believe that within the biblical canon, the twenty-seven books of the New Testament are preeminent.
    • The result of the Septuagint's formation was that it presented Christians with the possibility of retaining the Tanakh in their own canon.
    • To create a canon of sacred writings is to create a collection which will be in some sense normative for the community for which it is intended.
    • That may sound like a lot, but when you consider that there are nearly a million words in the whole of the Shakespeare canon, it's not as many as it seems.
    • He is in many ways a unique writer who confounds any simple pigeon-holing or attempts to locate writers in respect to an assumed canon of literature.
    • Indeed, a Caribbean female presence has established itself in the literary canons of both Canada and the United States.
    • No mention is made of the revision, which allowed the story to join the Simple canon, including publication in The Best of Simple.
    • Reading Scripture diachronically and synchronically, all views provided by the canon would be considered as in a kind of dialogue.
    • That experience for you is going to help you know what it feels like for the average teen reader, or the struggling reader, who reads below grade level, to try to plow through the books in the canon.
    • What he does not know about the Shakespeare canon and Shakespeare criticism is perhaps not worth knowing.
    • This one is as neat a demonstration of the Arthurian cycle as any book in the Clarke canon, and as stimulating.
    • He also said that Bermuda's education of its young is incomplete without the inclusion of established canons of African literature and other texts in the school curriculum.
    • And also Catholic Christians and Orthodox Christians do not have the exact same number of books in that Testament as do Jews in their canon, and Protestants as well.
    • Cultural competence is defined as ‘control of an established canon of literature’.
    • Do you think many of them are being absorbed into the Western canon, or is the canon being changed to accommodate them?
    • He is funny, dignified and minutely knowledgeable about the whole Christie canon, having dramatised all the Poirots and all the Radio 4 Miss Marples with June Whitfield.
    • The English department of Skidmore is pretty hospitable to the idea that those big, fat, male books are not the only important books in the canon.
    • Can't say I'm sufficiently familiar with Ms Francis's literary canon to comment.
    • As well as illuminating the subtle stylistic differences of these writers, Bergeron perceptively locates correspondences between the civic pageantry and other areas of the authors' canons, particularly the drama.
    • So far, the growth of cultural studies has accompanied (though not caused) an expansion of the literary canon.
    • I was rather surprised at the choosing of this opera for a new production, I am sure that there are other operas in the Janácek canon which are more in need of replenishment.
    • Ruth is one of only two books in the Hebrew canon that bears the name of a woman.
    • We now move to issue of reasons for inclusion and/or exclusion from the canon.
    • These notes display the wide range of the Thurman canon against the backdrop of the Harlem Renaissance.
    • We do not, therefore, believe that the Church can now be an organ of revelation, since the canon of Scripture has been completed.
    • I have that album as a constant reminder that one can regard an artist's entire canon with disinterest, but love one work with intense fascination.
    • Given the sheer size of V.S. Naipaul's canon and its general public appeal, it is surprising it took this long to adapt one of his novels to film.
    • Moi complained, ‘Showalter's aim, in effect, is to create a separate canon of women's writing, not to abolish all canons.’
    • The Jewish canon thus lists as prophetical many biblical books we regard as merely historical or political: from Judges to Samuel to Kings.
    • There is a significant contrast here with the slow and unsteady emergence of both Biblical canons.
    • Surely, even though it is necessary to question and dismantle canons, it is not an overstatement to claim that classical literature is the cornerstone of Western literature and society.
    • The biblical narratives of the Old Testament together with other texts that never made it into the canon provide useful background.
    • David Lane and Paul Ginsborg provide us with the two latest contributions to the expanding canon, and, although much of their source material is the same, the results are very different.
    • I simply do not believe in the validity of the concept of a canon, and for that reason I consider the important writers of the past not as models, but as challenges.
    • The same thing simply can't be said about any other two consecutively released studio albums in U2's canon.
    • Each exegetical section lists the three scripture readings of the Protestant canon for the day as well as the psalm; no exegesis is provided for the psalm.
    • In 771 he presented a petition to the throne asking that 77 scriptures in 101 scrolls that he had translated be added to the canon of scriptures.
    • A loose analogy with T. S. Eliot's notion of how a new classic affects the canon of a literature might be drawn here.
    • For one thing, he says, the canons of the two groups are different, and therefore, the ways Christians and Jews read their scripture will be divergent.
    • These phrases serve as bona-fides that the writer's no hack; he or she demonstrates a command of the canon, which lends authority to what's being argued.
    • Further, an author's canon provides an unstable foundation for constructing his or her personal beliefs, as scholarship on Map's works demonstrates.
    • The only other surviving writings that are exclusively apocalyptic in style come from outside our biblical canon and are usually unfamiliar to anyone but scholars in the field.
    • Most of us accept the canon of ‘all-time classics’ by reputation only.
    • Almost universally excluded from the canon of Woolf's major works, Flush has not been critically evaluated as what it declares itself to be: the biography of a dog.
    • No, not every Morrissey album has been great, but ‘You Are The Quarry’ fits right in to his extremely consistent canon.
    • It is more than just another book on this puzzling book of the biblical canon.
  • 3

    Music
    canon masculine
    • The Praeludium for Paul Hindemith uses a canon composed by Hindemith on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday in December 1960.
    • ‘River’ creates a big piece from a small idea, propelling a simple melody into rounds and canons that imitate the flowing, winding object of the song's title.
    • A canon for two voices using one line of melody is called a canon two in one, three voices with one melody a canon three in one, and so on.
    • His choral works, canons, and cantatas, some based on poems by Hildegard Jone, contain joyous words that initially clash with the fragmented tone cells, then merge with them.
    • He takes a little minuet on a journey ‘through contrapuntal couplets, canons and inversions beore breaking into romantic rhapsodising’.

There are 2 main translations of canon in Spanish

: canon1canon2

canon2

canónigo, n.

Pronunciation /ˈkanən//ˈkænən/

noun

  • 1

    (clergyman)
    canónigo masculine
    • The cathedral has been run by Canon Michael Glanville-Smith, the senior residentiary canon.
    • Alan Jones is Dean of Grace Episcopal Cathedral in San Francisco and an honorary canon of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres.
    • By 1216 there were approximately 700 houses and some 13,000 monks, nuns, canons, and canonesses.
    • Only 46 were bishops; so that the nobles, canons, and regulars who had hitherto controlled all the levers of power in the Church were exposed as lacking the confidence of their subordinates.
    • She became one of the first women ordained to the priesthood in 1994, moving to Salisbury the following year as canon treasurer, one of the cathedral's three residentiary canons.
    • After 15 years, he returned as parish priest to Beverley, during which time he was made a canon of the cathedral chapter in 1982.
    • The most powerful secular landlords in England founded new communities for canons and built outsized churches for them.
    • Cathedrals which were not monastic foundations, and collegiate churches, were served by secular clergy, the canons or prebendaries, who constituted the capitular body or chapter.
    • In 1457, after years of broken promises to return the cloth to the canons of Lirey and later to compensate them for its loss, Margaret was excommunicated.
    • The archbishop of Malines, Cardinal Josef Van Roey, made Lemaitre a canon of the cathedral in 1935.
    • The plans are being led by the church's vicar, Canon Derek Jackson, a former canon pastor of Bradford Cathedral.
    • In this way, for example, the canons of Salisbury quickly acquired their copies of Cicero and Plautus.
    • She is being made an honorary canon in recognition of her hospital work and will take over as rural dean of South Craven in February.
    • And why do we need three residentiary canons at the cathedral?
    • The movement spread across Europe by means of lay associations devoted to education and to prayer, known as Brethren of the Common Life, and a religious order known as the Windesheim canons.
    • When he returned to his native land, Copernicus was again granted leave from his official duties as a canon in the Ermland Chapter at Frauenburg.
    • Degree in hand, he returned home to Warmia, to serve as canon of the Cathedral Chapter of Frombork.
    • Later a canon at Westminster, he became a publicist for the North-West Passage idea and other projects, and adviser to the new East India Company in 1600.
    • He became a canon of the Order of St Augustine at the monastery of Holywood in Nithsdale.
    • The anonymous author of the Libellus classified monks and canons into three groups based on whether they lived far from men, like the Cistercians, or close to men, like the Victorines, or as hermits.
    • The area gets its name because six acres of land here were given to the canons of St Bartholemew's Priory, Smithfield, in 1331.
    • For example, in the Chapter of Gloucester - the group of canons who run the Cathedral - appointments are made alternately by the Dean and by the Church Commissioners.
    • Toward the end of mass in the St. Mark Chapel, the bishop or, if he was out of town, one of the cathedral canons, delivered a sermon.
    • Opposing the motion is Mr Tony Eastaugh, who describes himself as a horticultural asylum seeker; he will be seconded by the Canon Jim Seaton, a retired canon of the Church of England.
    • His descendants have been horrified to learn that the listed building has been sold by the Dean and canons of Manchester Cathedral for £250,000.
    • These circumstances explain the important role of the new religious orders in these areas - the Augustinian canons regular and each of the four main orders of friars in Ireland, for example, and the Cistercians in Wales.
    • The canons of Saint-Nizier, though, had the opportunity to portray Aunemund in a very different light.
    • The problem with the Windsor Report's reference to the canons of Nicaea, some conservatives have responded, is that it focuses on the wrong heretics.
    • While the presiding bishop acts as the church's executive director, the church canons do not give him final spiritual authority over his fellow bishops.
    • Many monks and canons, despite their ejection from the cloister, took the oath in order to qualify themselves for the cure of souls and a salary far better than the meagre pension allotted to ex-regulars.
    • This was an order of some thirty houses, of which the majority were for canons only.
    • Oliver O'Donovan is Regius Professor of Practical and Moral Theology at Oxford and a canon of Christ Church.
    • Higden apart, these were all secular clerks rather than monks or canons regular.
    • At first glance it would seem that religious women were put at a severe disadvantage by this increasing emphasis on votive Masses, a demand that could only be fulfilled by ordained monks and canons.
    • The canon's Requiem Mass was held in Waterford, Ireland, where he was born and spent his last years.
    • The power to sack vicars would be given to bishops under a proposed ‘common tenure’ arrangement for all clergy, including curates, cathedral canons and the bishops themselves.
    • A monastery (from the Greek ‘to live alone’) is a more or less self-contained settlement constructed to house a community of monks or canons.
    • They noted that Archbishop Louis de Villars had founded a college of canons at SaintNizier as a new enterprise on his own authority.
    • He, therefore, has decided to found on his own authority a college of canons there to protect the site.
    • As virgin patroness of the canons at Chich, Osith here joins a pantheon of elite women, both in terms of her companion texts and the manuscript's users.