There are 2 main translations of cant in Spanish

: cant1cant2

cant1

hipocresía, n.

Pronunciation: /kant//kænt/

noun

  • 1

    (insincere talk)
    hipocresía feminine
    • They will be exposed for things called hypocrisy and cant, and they will not get away with it.
    • Their hypocrisy, their cant and their lies are nailed to the wall and flayed with such devastating honesty and accuracy that one wonders how anyone could ever dare to be associated with their names again.
    • While the Irish government generates a lot of noisy, self-righteous cant about the evils of cigarettes at home, it makes a pretty packet from ‘selling death’ abroad.
    • For cant, humbug and moral spinelessness, this took some beating.
    • It annoyed Flaubert mightily that purveyors of political cant should be greeted with more ballyhoo than gifted poets.
    • Its satirical swipes at hypocrisy and cant make it a topical work amid the political spin of today.
    • Bloom, a pugnacious professor, says that he reads to clear his mind of cant and for self-improvement, not to influence others, which seems somewhat disingenuous given the subject of his book.
    • What pitiable cant to say, ‘She will live forever in my memory!’
    • In the purest form, realism holds that ideology has little impact on state behaviour but is rather a cloak to disguise the pursuit of real interests in the cant of religious or secular philosophy or rhetoric.
    • Yet the forthright honesty and steely lucidity of his voice in these interviews, his impatience with cant and pious waffle, also bear witness to the virtues of that rationality.
    • Any cant about representing farming is hollow and hypocritical.
    • Maybe it is time to reject cant and hypocrisy, shed this sham of political correctness.
    • Conservatism is realistic, honest, consistent, and opposed to cant.
    • He sees it as the paper's duty to expose cant and hypocrisy,’ said the source.
    • Most orthodox historians think that comments like these are mere hypocritical cant.
    • Politics and bureaucracy take over, however packaged in pedagogical cant about mentoring.
    • That embarrassment reminds you that Le Carré's Cold War-era novels were so good precisely because they were devoid of cant and moral sloganeering.
    • The common factor among the marchers was a rejection of cant, lies and hypocrisy.
    • No matter how tightly you wrap yourself in the flag the stench of untramelled cant and hypocrisy always emerges.
    • One feels that there is something healthy in his instinctive ability to cut through cant, including the ‘politically correct’ variety.
    • This was not a constructed language, but a secret vocabulary, a cant or argot in the linguist's term, which uses the grammar and syntax of English as well as most of its core vocabulary.
    • Otherwise his book is refreshingly free of theoretical cant or jargon, despite some nostalgia for a Marxist perspective and a deference to critics like Lukacs.
    • Except this time, gibberish is thieves' cant for… well… thieves' cant.
    • ‘We only want to ensure that potential reviewers of our software have the most current version’ is an approximation of the cant prepared for the job.
    • Wellington is changing by the hour: corporations now rule, the cant of the marketplace is all we can find.
    • Pat still gives lessons on the Traveller Language cant.
    • Some were familiar with the culture of the London underworld, and thieves' cant became the ‘flash’ language of the barracks and factories.
    • This is the essential function of a cliché, and of cant and jargon; to neutralise expression and ‘vanish memory’.
    • The regional intonations, like the period slang and cant and contemporary allusions of the time, are brilliantly captured.
    • Many words in English have obscure origins, particularly those which may be said to have risen in the world from lowly origins in argot, cant or slang.
    • One has entered the cant and canon of literary criticism.
    • Fagin, Sykes and Dodger use much more Dickensian language and pepper their sentences with thieves' cant.
    • The history of various families in Athy, their way of life, religion, superstition, Traveller cures and the Traveller language or cant are all documented.
    • Postmodern cant has also softened up many intellectuals for the renewed assaults of creationists, now taking form as ‘Intelligent Design Theory.’
    • Yet Smith also saw that the roots of ‘this frugality’ ran much deeper than Calvinist cant or even moral rectitude.
    • When Melissa canted her head to slant away the strand of straight blond hair, my eyes focused on her lips.
    • Mistaking it for swelling ardour, he cants his hips in just the wrong way again.
    • Tom suddenly slid out from beneath Aligore, skimming on his back across the canted deck.
    • My chest hurts and my body feels canted at the wrong angle.
    • In fact, it's not unusual to see a woman wearing high heels to make herself look taller, while canting her head to one side to make herself look shorter.
    • I agree that there is probably too much tertiary education, and/or that education is canted towards academic subjects which already have too many graduates rather than practical or vocational skills.
    • If you are right-handed, the arrow is on the right side of the bow, and if left - handed, on the left side. The bow is generally slightly canted to the arrow side.
    • The wreck here is open above, with the remains of the engine canted to port.
    • But it does take me a while to work out that the canted pillars with cups on top and pistons on the side are depth-charge catapults.
    • It has bulging ‘eyes,’ gaunt looking wings, and triple vertical stabilizers - the two outermost canted inward.
    • Because of the way it is constructed, the socket on a goosewing axe can rather easily be slanted, or canted away from the plane of the blade by the blacksmith.
    • Although some of the details might not be sophisticated enough for Soane, it is difficult to imagine that the form of the space with its canted walls was not directly influenced by him.
    • This holster can also be canted from a vertical position to a grip-forward or muzzle-forward position.
    • The stern is intact, though canted over to lie on its starboard side, like the rest of the wreck.
    • In order to grant the west front of the Campus Center a respectable height, Koolhaas canted the roof to accommodate the tube, leaving a roughly V-shaped south elevation.
    • He was a man above middle-age, with a sharp and wizened face, and he held his head canted so that he seemed to be ear-first as he faced you.
    • With its canted fairways framed by windswept dunes, Spanish Bay is a tribute to Scottish golf.
    • Because of the angle, we were canted back in our seats rather like being in an aircraft when it makes a steep ascent.
    • Hand-made of fine leather and trimmed in exotic alligator, the holster can be positioned straight, or canted forward for even more versatility.
    • She leaned against the bulkhead canting her head with a sigh.
    • Just then, the entire vessel canted to one side, as if thrown there by some unimaginable force.
    • The problem, again, is the ship is canted over at such an angle, they may not even be able to use their escape trunks because, you know, because the degree to which the ship is tilted prevents the hatches from opening.
    • The extension of the canting space at deepwater berths to provide for vessels up to 450 feet long is at present in hand.
    • The ship canted and slipped to one side, tables and chairs going flying with an awful crash as the floor undulated like a sea and tried to become one with the wall.
    • The ship canted, slipping from its high and imperious plane as three missiles slammed into the armour, their icy casings erupting into a sundering coldfire ball that burned in the craters.
  • 2

    (jargon)
    jerga feminine

There are 2 main translations of cant in Spanish

: cant1cant2

cant2

inclinar, v.

Pronunciation: /kant//kænt/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (make tilt)
    inclinar
    ladear
  • 2

    (ship/boat) hacer escorar

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (tilt)
    escorar

noun

  • 1

    (oblique surface)
    superficie inclinada feminine