Translation of cocoon in Spanish:

cocoon

capullo, n.

Pronunciation /kəˈkun//kəˈkuːn/

noun

Zoology

  • 1

    capullo masculine
    • They are like a pupa waiting in its cocoon for rebirth, ultimately becoming a butterfly.
    • Then they spin into a cocoon and either emerge as a second generation the same year or hibernate and emerge the next summer.
    • At that time, each larva wraps itself in a cocoon, plugs its chamber with silk, and becomes quiescent.
    • The delicate moth that emerges from the cocoon is a pale yellowish-green.
    • Later in the season, the caterpillars re-emerge to spin cocoons and overwinter under the loose bark of the trees.
    • While rodents often succeed in opening cocoons and extracting the nutritious pupae, birds rarely invest the time and effort needed to pierce the silken armor.
    • I saw a spider's web and an insect larva beginning to spin a cocoon.
    • Many people think that monarchs spin their cocoon but they in fact just shed their skin to form the chrysalis.
    • My first glimpse of a snow buttercup flowering beneath a thin pane of ice was not unlike my first experience of watching a monarch butterfly emerge from its cocoon.
    • Males in the cavity-nesting house wren frequently add arthropod cocoons to their nests during building, possibly as an ornamental cue for female choice.
    • Larvae remain in these cocoons through the winter and pupate in early spring.
    • The chrysalis is what the silkworm becomes when it finishes spinning its cocoon.
    • I would eventually watch some of them don a mantle of leaves and begin the process of weaving their own silk cocoons.
    • Moths such as the luna and polyphemus spend the winter months as pupae in leaf-wrapped cocoons.
    • Once spun, the cocoon takes on a silvery appearance, indicating that it is full of air that seeped out from the slit-like incisions in the root made by the larval hooks.
    • In Nest 1, the oldest cells held mature larvae ready to spin cocoons and medium-sized larvae.
    • She had been given the strange looking stones by the villagers, who believed them to be insect cocoons and items imbued with sacred significance.
    • Male and female cocoons were separated in the field by size and in the lab by weight.
    • This is once again an animal fibre, but is produced by the larvae of the silk worm moth, as it spins its cocoon.
    • We watched a group of airborne insects break out of cocoons two stories above the street, crawl down the side of the building, then back up again as butterflies.

transitive verb

  • 1

    to cocoon sb in sth arrebujar / arropar a algn en/con algo
    • he was cocooned in his own private world vivía en su propio mundo
    • We keep a look out for friends' boats and chat to lock-keepers but for most of the time we're cocooned in our comfortable, private world.
    • With two hours to kill, I stopped in one of those terminal bars where you can fill your stomach and, cocooned in anonymity, read a newspaper.
    • As we did so, everyone at the table mirrored our movement so that we were cocooned in secrecy.
    • Trucks and cars swoosh past us occasionally, otherwise we are cocooned in the subliminal hum of the forest.
    • The Bible sits, nestled in pink tissue paper and cocooned in a wooden box.
    • The lavender cream is massaged into your skin before you're cocooned in thermal sheets.
    • By writing books like this we ensure that we remain cocooned in our own little world of fantasies
    • Maybe, just maybe the musician knew his son - cocooned in amniotic fluid - was listening as he blew saxophone notes across to his girlfriend's belly.
    • This ‘air scarf’ means that as you drive along with the roof down your head is cocooned in a pillow of warm air.
    • The individual on whom I wish to focus began life blind to its problems and cocooned in luxury.
    • ‘It is difficult starting up any new business, particularly if you have been cocooned in a comfortable corporate lifestyle,’ he said.
    • You lie there, cocooned in the covers, making mental lists of all you should do that day, must do.
    • Instantly my mind saw myself on the back porch of my childhood home cocooned in quilts, reading.
    • They were cocooned in their own world, with not the slightest concern for anyone around.
    • He explained: ‘As ministers, we are cocooned in the official system of advice.’
    • Rather than being cocooned in five-star sterility, it's fun and comfortable to stay at one of these innumerable small homely hotels.
    • He was still cocooned in the huge, puffy white blanket.
    • She allowed herself to be cocooned in the warm swaddling cloth of his borrowed shirt, feeling, for once, safe and warm and almost invincible.
    • While motorists are safely cocooned in a metal shell, bikers are exposed and vulnerable.
    • Passengers were to be cocooned in compartments lined with deep cushions, but they preferred to see out, and the idea never caught on.