Translation of confection in Spanish:

confection

dulce, n.

Pronunciation /kənˈfɛkʃ(ə)n//kənˈfɛkʃ(ə)n/

noun

  • 1

    (sweet)
    dulce masculine
    • Maybe it's psychological, but of course, chocolate is mostly associated with bars, toppings, truffles and other sweet confections.
    • Today it is used in a variety of sweet foods and beverages, particularly chocolate, confections, bakery goods, perfumery, and, obviously, ice cream.
    • Daily specials keep things lively, from a haunting goat-cheese flan to a melting confection of strawberries and coconut ice cream.
    • Chocolat de couverture is the special type of chocolate that pâtissiers and chocolate makers use for their confections.
    • This is a good way to use up the melted chocolate leftover from other chocolate confections.
    • But then again, such creations as eel ice cream are a revelation to the world of seafood and confections.
    • Chocolatier Joël Durand flavors his confections with home-grown rosemary and thyme, almond praline, bitter honey - even black olives.
    • It adds interest to steamed rice and is often used in fruit salads, pudding, homemade ice cream and other confections.
    • Truth to tell, some dessert confections here gave me sugar fits, too.
    • Commercially available forms of these enhanced proteins have applications in a number of processed food applications, she adds, such as frozen desserts, confections, sauces and cheeses.
    • Equally important is helwa, a sweet confection based on clarified butter, honey, and spices.
    • Another tasty way to show off your cordials is in luxuriously rich ice cream toppings, sweets and confections such as truffles.
    • She had multiple servings of each sweet pie, cake, confection, tort, ice cream, bun and pastry they had.
    • In these honeycombs he made the confection sweeter than before.
    • ‘They sell coffees until 11 in the morning, chocolate confections from 11 to 3, and people stop in and buy a box of chocolates when they go home at night,’ he says.
    • It was good enough to eat for dessert - the precise use to which I was putting it, having bypassed the assortment of very sweet Indian confections on offer that day.
    • The event pits local chocolatiers against one another to create the tastiest confection.
    • There was also a tottering confection called the ‘chocolate pistachio pinnacle,’ which seemed dry and a little structurally unsound to me.
    • Whipped cream adds a touch of luxury to almost any dessert and is essential for certain sweet confections such as ice cream sundaes.
    • Too bad the final dish is an over-baked confection that falls well below its primary chef's abilities.
  • 2

    (creation)
    creación feminine
    • The film serves up a sugarcoated confection that will make anyone with a taste for Nabokov gag.
    • Billed as showcases of glamour and infotainment, both are classic confections of ignorance and candlelight.
    • The sweet confection is to be sampled by a group which has somehow gained the title of the Six Wise Men - the leadership of Scotland's governing parties, engaged in the deal-making that makes coalitions work.
    • And yes, his canvases are gorgeous - well-executed mixed media confections filled with vivid iconography and fresh colour combinations.
    • Allegretto was an insouciant confection - played with vigor and bravado.
    • This is a charming confection of excerpts from old favourites mixed with modern pieces.
    • The creation of such a universal confection for the eye, by means of printed poetry or fiction or history or essays or memoirs and so on, isn't possible.
    • She is a fur-laden confection of fashion, from her enormous hat to her dainty boots.
    • A final work, Unravel, was a mainly white confection of foam-core strips, slivered paper plates and disassembled Chinese lanterns that descended from the ceiling in a vortex.
    • She was an exotic delicacy he wanted to try, a sweet confection from a far-off land.
    • The fairy-tale confection of John's architecture lit up purple and white.
    • During the 19th century most countries developed a voracious appetite for paintings of historical events, running the gamut from fancy-dress confections to work with more serious aims.
    • This violinist has played the Romantic confections of Wieniawski and Tchaikovsky, but Schnittke doesn't give him much of an opportunity to show how pretty his tone can be.
    • There is very little point: the songs are samey; the lyrics nothing like the witty confections they are lauded as.
    • A lovely pop confection, that whistling riff has been stuck in my head for the last 20 years.
    • It is a mark of the limitations of current popular literary criticism that the obituaries speak only of such confections, wrongheaded ancestry and extra-literary politics.
    • Academics will call the book a childish confection and analyze it as media myth and pop psychology.
    • The flowers are small, pink and white confections born on the end of each branch, each endowed with a sharp, sweet fragrance that carries for yards in still air.
    • Galliano has always had a playful spirit with clothes, literally whipping them into confections of pure fantasy.
    • This has it all, a peculiar confection of tall tales and reality blended together in a strange and moving way.