Translation of conjoined twins in Spanish:

conjoined twins

gemelos unidos, n.

plural noun

  • 1

    gemelos unidos masculine
    gemelas unidas feminine
    • There is a sort of decadence in our fascination with conjoined twins.
    • There are giants and small people and circuses and conjoined twins and people with 1950s-type haircuts and small-town smiles in strange situations.
    • One of the conjoined twins fails to develop fully in the womb.
    • Throughout recorded history there are many references to surviving conjoined twins.
    • Medical oddities such as conjoined twins, odd-shaped foetuses and babies with congenital abnormalities interested those who wanted to know about such things at first hand.
    • He hated publicity, but his work on cranially conjoined twins attracted attention.
    • The conjoined twins, who are now doing well in intensive care, were joined mid-chest to mid-abdomen and their livers were fused.
    • The controversial case of conjoined twins, recently decided by the Court of Appeal in England, has been different.
    • Two sets of conjoined twins have been separated at St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, which is caring for the twins.
    • It is a film with its heart in the right place, even if it often feels like a one-joke movie in which the daily challenges of being conjoined twins are milked for every possible gag and observation.
    • They gambled everything to lead independent lives, but yesterday the brave conjoined twins whose plight has gripped the world for months lost everything.
    • Of course, the subject matter is about as taboo as it gets, after all, this is a comedy about conjoined twins.
    • This is a collection of stories about people with genetic irregularities: conjoined twins, babies born with one eye, people who are unusually small, or tall, or hairy.
    • In this unfortunate situation, they have a tendency to rely on dubious authorities, like a local ‘expert’ on conjoined twins who held a press conference after what must have been a very brief session reading up on his subject.
    • Her primary subject is conjoined twins, one of the most extreme examples, but she also brings into the story people with cleft lips, dwarfs, giants, and hermaphrodites.
    • As for personal identity, there are plenty of philosophical discussions of ‘brain-division, brain transplantation, bodily fusion and so on’, but none, I think, of conjoined twins.
    • I wonder though - is it really a frightening ‘sign of things to come’ or is it just like human conjoined twins?
    • Just as women and racial minorities have come to be recognised as different but equal, so, she argues, society must come to respect the rights of conjoined twins, of intersexuals, of people born with cleft palates, of dwarves and giants.
    • Other than conjoined twins, I can't think of another example of two people - one body.
    • They get themselves a fitting agent who lives in a retirement home and drives along in a wheelchair, but remarks knowingly that conjoined twins will be a tough sell.