Translation of crust in Spanish:


corteza, n.

Pronunciation: /krʌst//krəst/


  • 1

    (of bread)
    corteza feminine
    costra feminine
    a crust of bread un mendrugo
    • without a crust to eat sin qué comer
    • to earn a / one's crust ganarse los garbanzos
    • Before long he had me saving scraps of bacon and stray crusts.
    • She does everything but cut the crusts off his toast soldiers to go with his boiled egg.
    • These are made of white toast with their crusts cut off, and are filled with smoked salmon and prawn mayonnaise.
    • Cut the crusts away from the bread and soak the slices briefly in water, then squeeze them until almost dry.
    • Like always, he cut off the crust before eating it.
    • But it's not a roll because bread rolls have a crust and barm cakes are soft.
    • In bread baking, you add a little bit of salt so that, instead of a lumpy, haphazard crust, you get gorgeous, round, smooth loaves.
    • If done wrong it can be as bland as a slice of white bread with the crusts cut off.
    • Who do you think is really responsible for the legions of ragged students begging for crusts of bread in Cambridge and Berkeley?
    • How often have restaurant forgotten that bread is part of the meal and have given their customers stale, hard crusts.
    • Remove the crusts from the bread and cut a piece to fit the base of a one litre pudding basin or bowl.
    • No one shook with more anger than when they glimpsed a rat contentedly gnawing on a slice of carrot or crust of bread.
    • And they all traipsed out for another round of triangular sandwiches with the crusts cut off and a wee cup of tea served in the best china.
    • It was a classic British summer tea; small smoked salmon sandwiches with the crusts cut off; tiny scones with jam and cream the size of a 10p piece and miniature strawberry tarts.
    • The slices of thick, airy, white loaf with burnt crusts lathered in creamy butter were completely moreish.
    • I got a very dry roll with my soup today, and caught myself removing the inner soft bread, beyond the tough crust, and rolling it up to plop into the soup.
    • Just cut off the crusts of some slightly stale bread, and whiz the bread in a food processor.
    • They gave their Great Niece the red carpet treatment, cooking up a feast of scones with jam and cream, fruit cake, sponge cake, Anzac biscuits and a genteel plate of sandwiches with the crusts cut off.
    • The water will start to steam, making the air in the oven moist, which will help the bread to rise and give it a nice, crisp crust.
    • The traditional bread, especially in the northwest, is broa, a grainy corn bread with a thick crust.
    • The sandwiches were on white bread and every crust was cut off neatly from the edge.
    • But the more evident marauder is pigeons, thanks to the sandwich crusts left by lunchers and the feed spread by misguided bird fanciers.
    • Her accompanying garlic bread is real bread with a proper crust, spread with freshly prepared garlic butter and chopped parsley.
    • The exterior crust is supposed to be crispy and golden brown, but this one tastes like cardboard.
    • Others let their babies chomp down on their fingers, or offer dried crusts of bread or peeled carrot sticks (stay nearby in case of choking).
    • The potato was badly discoloured and the pastry crust was decidedly soggy.
    • It was not lacking any salt, and the crust was superb.
    • Sometimes this was encased in a rich crust of pastry or dough similar to saffron bread, a form reminiscent of the Scottish black bun.
    • Its pastry crust speaks to a diner of infinite potential, obscuring what's within and defying conventional conceptions of identity.
    • Whether you serve a fruity deep-dish cobbler draped with a homemade pastry crust or a lush pumpkin cheesecake, keep the servings small.
    • So does the lobster pot pie, which contains an assortment of vegetables, a dose of heavy cream, plus a crumbly pastry crust.
    • Baked in the oven under a pastry crust and served hot with boiled potatoes and a green vegetable it's a dish fit for a king.
    • You may already be familiar with its crispy crust pastry and mildly spiced creamy filling but now you can prepare this tasty French delicacy in your own kitchen.
    • As with the 18th century version, the dish will be finished off with a pastry crust.
    • At first it seems like we are going to make good progress because the top crust of the snow is frozen enough to hold our body weight.
    • Despite its thin crust of moderate strength, the clay becomes much softer with depth.
    • What's under threat here is simply civilization, the thin crust we lay across the seething magma of nature, including human nature.
    • It is as if the lava from an erupting volcano had hardened into a crust just before it engulfed the neighborhood.
    • After a late start due to a very wet spring, a combination of more rain and a mini-heatwave baked the soil to a hard crust, capping over the seedlings and killing them.
    • With each step, their hooves press lightly, then break through the icy crust atop the shallow snow.
    • The great gray is extremely powerful, able to crash through thick crusts of snow to seize rodents scurrying beneath.
    • We walked on and on, yet I felt no weariness, just a little discomfort as the filth that clung to me began to harden into a crust.
    • The lowlands of the island are blanketed with muskeg, a type of bog up to 3 feet deep with a hard crust on top.
    • The soil, it found, has the consistency of wet sand or clay and is covered by a thin crust… of something.
    • Making a judgement based on his outer crust you might assume he could be facile and lightweight in a clever kind of way.
    • Additional signs include itchy skin located around ears, head and neck as well as thick crusts around the outer ear and possible crusts and scales on the neck, rump and tail.
    • For example, terms exist for powdery snow, snow that fell yesterday, and snow that is soft underneath with a hard crust on top.
    • It is never more than around half a metre deep, and below it sits a hard crust of limestone, a stratum of free-draining limestone clay, then gravel and finally an enormous water table.
    • A thin crust of coral is rooted in the sea bed by a fixture of limestone.
    • I had the warm chocolate tart, with a soft crust hiding its delectable molten interior, while a chocolate sauce kept the whole mélange from being cloying.
    • Many canopy trees have protruding crowns, and light availability at the surface of the canopy crust should also differ depending on the position relative to the apex of the crown.
    • At this point, the ulcers may develop thin crusts or verrucous changes or may continuously drain serous fluid.
    • Lines as corny as this can have someone in the audience break into laughter, and the thin crust of magic that keeps the film afloat will fall into splinters.
    • Cementitious products form a crust over the soil surface once they have set.
  • 2

    (of pie)
    tapa de masa feminine
  • 3

    (thin outer layer)
    costra feminine
    corteza feminine
    the earth's crust la corteza terrestre
    • a crust of ice una capa de hielo

intransitive verb

  • 1

    formar (un) poso