There are 2 main translations of cue in Spanish

: cue1cue2

cue1

entrada, n.

Pronunciation /kju//kjuː/

noun

  • 1

    Music entrada feminine
    Theatre pie masculine
    (word/phrase) (before noun) (invariable adjective) clave
    that's your cue to show what you can do ese es el momento de demostrar de lo que eres capaz
    • to give sb her/his cue darle el pie a algn
    • to miss one's cue no salir a escena en el momento debido
  • 2

    Psychology
    impulso masculine

transitive verb

  • 1

    (actor) darle el pie a
    (musician) darle la entrada a
    cue camera one! ¡cámara uno, acción!
    • Like laugh tracks, they cue our emotional responses, but they also disguise their coerciveness by making us feel included.
    • As the game shifts in tone from the humorous to the dark and back again, this production feels compelled to cue the audience with an almost comic earnestness.
    • It cues our hate to keep us watching, like a bullfighter taunting a bull: waving red to draw our attention and anger.
    • On set, instead of saying ‘Action’, he cued his actors by firing a gun.
    • When cued by the end of a song or solo, the room would erupt into enthusiastic applause and ‘woos,’ not to mention the standing ovations that brought both concerts to an end.
    • Some lines in his movies sound as if they were written to cue his reactions, and they are the more memorable for that.
    • The cast is great, but everything is so cued, signed, and anticipated that the movie makes me sick at times.
    • But when he goes down to the valley, it's the same two sentences in Spanish, and then they cue the mariachis.
    • In the earlier days, I wanted the music to cue you almost like a curtain.
    • A tinny soundtrack is used to cue the arrival of dramatic tension - a job that is better left to performers.
    • He won't speak to the press unless an overture of fanned notes cues him.
    • A group of teenagers have taken it upon themselves to cue a new snooker hall for the people of the town.
    • The musicians sit scattered at both ends of the stage, warming up for an improv exercise in which they cue dancers to stop dancing by quickly interrupting their movement with music.
    • A slicker actor would have cued revulsion in children, but here the icky inevitability of movie clinches had been thwarted.
    • Ok I embellish but that's my interpretation when she cues the violins.
    • So, not content with reducing my audience to laughter with my first attempt, I cued the musicians to start over.
    • Our vast inside sources cued us in about this extraordinary gentleman.
    • Unity was the message; cue loud applause from almost the entire room.
    • Note the telling musical score, anticipating events, cueing the audience as to when to be scared, assuming we cannot figure that out ourselves.
    • So it cues you that something's around and you try and contain that.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (in snooker, billiards)
    (ball) embocar
    • ‘I missed a few easy balls today but I am cueing brilliantly,’ he said.
    • And the three times Regal Masters champion was soon cueing superbly.
    • I am cueing well, but every now and then I make an unbelievable howler.
    • It gives me time get back to the way I was cueing before Sheffield.
    • The Welshman just about deserved to edge ahead after cueing so well in the early stages of the match, although his game dipped after the interval.
    • ‘Stephen deserved to win it - he was cueing beautifully and produced his best form when it mattered,’ said the six-times champion.
    • But I started cueing well and Alan couldn't put me away,’ he said.

There are 2 main translations of cue in Spanish

: cue1cue2

cue2

taco, n.

Pronunciation /kju//kjuː/

noun

  • 1

    (in snooker, billiards)
    taco masculine