Translation of debauch in Spanish:

debauch

pervertir, v.

Pronunciation /dəˈbɔtʃ//dɪˈbɔːtʃ/

transitive verb

literary

  • 1

    pervertir
    corromper
    • Why has CBS News decided it would rather debauch its brand and treat its audience like morons than simply admit their hoax?
    • Tonight, in front of the entire Law Enforcement Workers Association of New York, I will debauch you on the main gala dinner table.
    • The principle of ministerial responsibility has been debauched by its invocation on any conceivable occasion, to the extent that it has become almost meaningless.
    • This is why men who weary their imagination in books are less suitable for procreative functions; while those who dissipate their spirits in debauching women cannot apply themselves to serious study.
    • Politics was debauched a long time ago by television, and it's not going to go back, they're not going to change it, it's not going to get any better.
    • Is it ethical to do so, is it moral to debauch one's artistic integrity at the altar of Oscar greed?
    • So thoroughly have they debauched its role that, were it not for the requirements of the Constitution, we could close it down tomorrow and it would make no difference.
    • If they knew the nature and worth of religion, they would not debauch it to such shameful purposes.
    • Lenin is said to have said the best way to destroy the Capitalist System was to debauch the currency.
    • To call what this aerial armada did a ‘war’, as distinct from unchallenged slaughter, is to debauch language.
    • However, soon too many dollars are chasing too few goods, debauching the currency, as John Maynard Keynes once wrote, and eventually the exchange.
    • When the Scots diarist James Boswell travelled to Corsica in 1765, he was warned he would be killed instantly if he so much as attempted ‘to debauch any of their women’.
    • Apparently the Count debauches his own mother before turning paedophile.
    • They have debauched the values on which the party was founded.
    • Today, the prime minister is fond of ranting about the ‘public service ethic’; but that ethic has cynically been debauched by the government.
    • Good luck to him: but there is no earthly reason why BBC radio should timidly do the same, and debauch one of our greatest programmes in the process.
    • Given enough drugs, money and the right opportunities, anyone can debauch themselves.
    • They have seen public life debauched by Labour on an unprecedented scale.
    • I don't think Derek would have debauched me right there in Lady Danbury's garden, but still… just then, I would have given everything to go back and see how far he took us before he pulled back.
    • The drain of the agricultural population to big cities, due chiefly to persuading them to abandon their natural ideals, has not only made the country less tolerable to the peasant, but debauched the town.
    • This administration has debauched our once independent civil service. It has also plundered our pension funds, condemning millions to meagre pickings in their retirement.
    • There is no subtler, no surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency.

noun

literary

  • 1

    orgía feminine