Translation of emollient in Spanish:

emollient

emoliente, n.

Pronunciation /ɪˈmɒlɪənt//əˈmɑljənt/

noun

  • 1

    emoliente masculine

adjective

  • 1

    (lotion/cream) emoliente
    • Avoid soap, which can be drying, and instead wash with aqueous cream or an emollient wash.
    • To minimize irritation from shaving, use a new blade and an emollient shave cream that contains moisturizing ingredients.
    • The emollient creams make the top layers of skin seem moister for a short time, but the other ingredients are actually drying the skin so you have to use more of the lotion, etc.
    • The most likely irritant in emollient creams is the stabiliser propylene glycol.
    • In addition to this, liberal use of emollient creams such as aqueous cream is important - at least four times a day, more if possible.
    • There are several tar based shampoos and emollient preparations that you can buy over - the - counter.
    • Try either of these creams, which are both emollient treatments providing relief from nappy rash without the use of preservatives and steroids that can weaken a baby's soft, delicate skin.
    • A deliciously rich source of moisture extracted from the fruit of the Karite tree, shea butter is a natural fat that is often used as an emollient base for a variety of hair and skin products.
    • Almond oil is used as an emollient because of its ability to soften the skin.
    • Very occasionally, emollient creams may sting the skin when first applied to very dry skin.
    • If you have really dry skin, says Rogers, ‘use emollient lotions with humectants such as urea lactate, then apply moisturizing cream to seal in moisture.’
    • A range of shampoos, emollient products and some topical steroid preparations can be bought from pharmacies.
    • Sebaceous glands secrete sebum, and in skin they are thought to have bacteriostatic, emollient, and barrier functions in humans.
    • The steroid should always be applied to the skin first and the emollient moisturizer applied after to all of the skin.
    • It is an incredibly emollient skin-shielding cream - perfect for preventing chapped skin.
  • 2

    (appeasing)
    conciliatorio
    • The noble Lord's emollient talents were therefore deployed to save the stalled bill by cutting a deal with the Tory leader in the lords.
    • He found the French in surprisingly emollient mood.
    • Even the emollient secretary of state, is bitter: he believes they have double-crossed him in the UN Security Council.
    • At the local carabinieri station, an officer was more emollient: ‘By the end of the month everything should be resolved.’
    • By and large, this approach has proved useful and even emollient.
    • In truth, the party will remain unelectable until it learns how to conduct a conversation with the country, employing a more emollient vocabulary…
    • They'll spout a lot of emollient guff and sensible criticism of the government, which you can even find yourself nodding along to when they're on Question Time.
    • What he gets is the poignant, emollient presence of Connelly who looks soulfully at him.
    • When I talked about security, he gave me an emollient smile and said: ‘I think you'll find it very safe.’
    • He subsequently traveled to The Hague to make more emollient, if less publicized, remarks.
    • One diplomat said the anti-war camp in fact raised no objections to his proposal last week partly out of deference to his more emollient tone on their plans for European Union defence.
    • True, as we said from the start, the minister's emollient words in January had to be set to one side to ensure a seriously flawed and dangerous bill was radically restructured.
    • While adopting the emollient tones of compassionate Conservatism, he has also toned down the virulent anti-Europeanism.
    • The bombings and attempted bombings in London have brought home to the American public that we face implacable enemies unwilling to be appeased by even the most emollient diplomacy.
    • He surely must have noticed it but, as the writer suggests, he was probably an emollient sort of character, a man never happy about getting into rows.
    • It gets Andrew a new editor and the group a much more emollient senior manager who can lift morale.