Translation of export in Spanish:

export

exportar, v.

Pronunciation /ɪkˈspɔrt//ɛkˈspɔːt//ˈɛkspɔːt//ɪkˈspɔːt//ˈɛkspɔrt/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (goods/commodities) exportar
    oil-exporting countries países exportadores de petróleo masculine
    • The most popular items exported by the company at present are pharmaceuticals, school text books, and items related to the security operation.
    • Most of this is used by the domestic brewing and distilling industries with some 60,000 tonnes being exported annually.
    • I am certain that most people hate the idea of exporting our horses to be made into sausages and salami.
    • Irish companies export more services to Britain than they do to all other 13 European Union member states combined.
    • In 1998, the country exported products worth $575 million.
    • At the time, Britain exported industrial goods and imported agricultural ones.
    • The agricultural products are exported all over the world with the barley in particular being in high demand.
    • The finished products are exported to the rest of Central America.
    • Many developed countries now export more developed machinery and more sophisticated consumer goods.
    • Countries that exported agricultural goods (like Hungary) imported farm equipment.
    • With sheer devotion and dedication he built his company into a key tea exporter and spread its wings to export black tea to over 15 nations.
    • The ostrich meat is mainly exported to the European Union countries.
    • The remaining 2.17 million tonnes was exported to the mainland or other countries for recycling.
    • After the cars are stolen they are passed on to another criminal, who exports them out of the country to other right-hand-drive jurisdictions.
    • While it exports pricey services, Britain is importing capital since the rising pound is a magnet for global bond investors.
    • Rice was exported at an average price of 35 % below cost of production.
    • These rules can make it impossible to export your goods into the third country market.
    • Last year, Irish-based companies exported more than 400 consignments of dual-use goods worth €1.3bn.
    • Government authorities will be given the power to inspect and audit companies which export military-related equipment under new laws to be introduced later this year.
    • He has enjoyed a successful career exporting goods into Africa and now he's written a book on the subject.
  • 2

    Computing
    (data) exportar
    • Efforts are being made to export the database to a more robust data management system like Oracle or MySQL.
    • Once the aforementioned data is gathered into the database, one can simply choose to export data into EAD format.
    • However, we were not able to export the file or perform a ‘save as’ and possibly export it into a spreadsheet or desktop publishing program.
    • For presentation purposes, images were exported in tiff format.
    • The data from tt can be exported in several formats into a MySQL database, an ASCII file, etc.

noun

  • 1

    (item exported)
    artículo de exportación masculine
    producto de exportación masculine
    invisible exports exportaciones invisibles feminine
    • exports exceeded imports las exportaciones sobrepasaron las importaciones
    • As the end of 1999 approached, consistently dismal domestic and export coal loadings gave the nation's ports little reason to cheer.
    • A product that is sold to the global market is an export, and a product that is bought from the global market is an import.
    • An interesting issue concerns the charges for transporting Hunter Valley export coal.
    • The impact of these requirements was immediately felt in developing countries for which fishery products are an important export.
    • This is because exports can now be sold or imports bought more cheaply or more easily inside the trading area.
    • Train drivers refused to cross the miners' picket, stopping the movement of all export coal to the port of Lyttelton.
    • The country grows 70% of the world's supply of jute, and jute products are an important export, despite falling world demand.
    • There has been some modest economic growth, the devaluation making Argentina's exports more competitive.
    • A stronger dollar makes American exports less competitive abroad, hurting sales.
  • 2

    (act of exporting)
    exportación feminine
    for export only reservado para exportación
    • before noun export beer cerveza de exportación
    • an export drive una campaña de fomento a la exportación
    • export finance financiación de la exportación
    • export manager gerente de exportación
    • export market mercado de exportación
    • export sales exportaciones
    • the export trade el comercio exportador / de exportación
    • In 1995 animal rights groups took direct action to prevent the live export of cattle from Britain to the Continent.
    • The regulations provide that the board is the sole agent of growers in the sale and export of New Zealand grown hops.
    • This is increasingly being recognised in Asia, which bodes well for growth in the export of these products.
    • This destruction is accelerated by the activities of cattle ranchers who grow beef for export to fast food chains in the United States.
    • They also provide assistance in the export of manufactured products of the heavy and chemical industries.
    • Moreover, we clearly would prefer to expand the export of high value goods.
    • In the first round, 100% tariffs were slapped on the export of all bath products.
    • The future development of the private sector in Russia is now at risk as a result of the wholesale export of capital.
    • Modern, corporate farming - monocultural rice, or maize grown for export as cattle feed - is a prime cause of the deficiency that leads to blindness.
    • The international institutions and the government decreed that farmers could only get credit if they grew crops for export.
    • The main objective is to facilitate the export of goods and services from the US to countries such as Bulgaria.
    • Deeply unpopular with merchants, traders, seamen, and farmers growing crops for export, the Embargo Act was repealed in 1809.
    • The other is an initiative to boost the export of renewable energy technologies to developing countries.
    • Certainly, peasant farmers can grow food crops for export, but global food prices are too low for them to make a living.
    • The Confederate government could have achieved the necessary reduction in cotton production by taxing the export of cotton.
    • The bananas grown for export are suitable for being picked when only two-thirds ripe, and continue to ripen during shipment.
    • Again, fear of competition, led the English parliament to prohibit the export of wool from Ireland in 1699.
    • The Government has decided to allocate three million leva to stimulate the export of processed agricultural products.
    • The ban on the export of agricultural produce from Louth will also expire on April 19, providing there is no further outbreak.
    • The vegetables and flowers they grow will be for export.