There are 2 main translations of florentine in Spanish

: florentine1Florentine2

florentine1

Pronunciation /ˈflɒrəntiːn//ˈflɑːrəntiːn/

noun

  • 1

    galleta de frutos secos cubierta de chocolate
    • While Lippi was completing the Strozzi commission, Florentines were listening to Savonarola inveighing against the deceitful seductions of modern painters.
    • I decided to do more of a florentine cookie, but stick with the cream.
    • She also had a square of home-baked Florentine.

There are 2 main translations of florentine in Spanish

: florentine1Florentine2

Florentine2

florentino, adj.

Pronunciation /ˈflɔrəntin//ˈflɒr(ə)ntʌɪn/

adjective

  • 1

    florentino
    • It was a gift in 1716 from the Prussian royal house to Russia, where it was later enhanced by four priceless Florentine mosaics - and it aroused the greed of the Wehrmacht during the Second World War.
    • Donald Sassoon has written an entertaining study in which he traces how the rather unprepossessing Florentine face of La Giaconda became a global icon.
    • Novelist and aesthetician, she lived in her mother's Florentine villa with her, but took wing for a season each year to spend some time in London, where she was an accepted figure on the literary scene.
    • From the fourteenth century onwards, Spanish lustreware had been the tableware of choice in Italy, and in the fifteenth century Florentine families above all commissioned services from Spain emblazoned with their arms.
    • An Italian academic, Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University, claimed recently to have found evidence of its use in the records of Florentine merchants nearly 500 years ago.
    • Her work rests on a creative interpretation of sociohistorical information, much of it primary material gleaned from archival sources, specifically from Florentine archives.
    • Not only do the voices in the journal bear no mark of an illiterate 16 th-century shepherd or 15 th-century Florentine teenager; they do not even sound like the voice of an early 20 th-century art historian.
    • This is no inhabitant of heaven, but flesh and blood - a callow, ruddy-cheeked Florentine youth who, distracted by the emotion of the moment, has allowed his music to fall.
    • With a strictly observed timetable, I managed to have a very satisfying Florentine experience in only three days, but such an intensive injection of culture is exhausting.
    • In addition, the gold florin, the local coin minted by Florentine guilds, became the standard currency of Europe and one of the first since Roman times to be used so widely.
    • Dan Hill was intrigued by a sentence in Hammersley's Florentine adventures: ‘There are eight storey apartment blocks built in 1250!’
    • Piecing together her reports on her researches into Florentine politics and history is a bit like working through a history of the Medici as rewritten by an Asian James Joyce.
    • The group's six serenely delicious Florentine properties and its Tuscan idyll will be joined by the much-anticipated Suites in Via Condotti, in Rome, this year.
    • He traced Piero's sources in Sienese and Florentine painting and speculated on his influence in Ferrara and Venice with unparalleled delicacy and subtlety.
    • His father, a notary, showed some of them to a friend of Andrea del Verrocchio's, the leading sculptor of the day, and in the late 1460s, Leonardo entered the latter's Florentine workshop.
    • The final roads lacked the quaint character, of the small Florentine highways.
    • In the film's climactic scene, emissaries from Renaissance Italy, at first disdainful of these eastern barbarians, witness the casting of a giant bronze bell, a triumph of Russian craft to compare with Florentine or Venetian ingenuity.
    • The valley walls are dragged with colour like the fly leaves of Florentine books; the needle peaks thread the clouds and the Spiti river runs the same colour as the local turquoise around the necks of the women in the villages.
    • With multiple functions - dam, roadway and royal pavilion - the two-storey covered bridge and its archways look almost Florentine.
    • The dragon motif was not unprecedented in contemporary Florentine metalwork, as it appears on the reliquary Lorenzo Ghiberti and his workshop made for the arm of Saint Andrew at Citta di Castello in about 1420.