Translation of footstep in Spanish:

footstep

paso, n.

Pronunciation /ˈfʊtstɛp//ˈfʊtˌstɛp/

noun

  • 1

    paso masculine
    • You've closed the door in your room, but you can hear his footsteps coming up the stairs.
    • He heard footsteps from behind the black door, and a shadow formed underneath it.
    • It had only been five minute into her break when she heard footsteps behind her.
    • Occasionally she heard muffled footsteps pacing in the hallways and rooms below her.
    • I heard a footstep behind me, and I looked to see blue leather pants.
    • He was about to turn away, when he heard footsteps coming up the church path from the gate.
    • I could still smell him in the laundry, hear his footstep, and run my hands over tools he'd touched every day.
    • The girl looked up as she heard Rick's soft footsteps against the metal gangplank.
    • Doreen was lying awake in a hospital room when she heard the footsteps coming to her door in the early hours.
    • I heard a footstep a few yards away, and I turned slowly.
    • If she heard footsteps she would wonder whether it was him, if he'd be there when she got home from school.
    • The door opened and he heard the footsteps as Ben walked in and closed the door behind him.
    • She sits up with an apprehensive stare into the distance, as if she heard a footstep on the strange track she has elected to follow.
    • She was startled as she heard the footsteps of two people clattering down the stairwell.
    • I turned round after hearing some footsteps behind me and he was right in my face.
    • As she walked towards the town centre with a friend, she heard footsteps behind her.
    • At night time it is said you can still hear her footsteps as she ascends that staircase.
    • You can feel the rough fabric of theatre greens and the heat of the delivery room and hear your footsteps on the ward.
    • On the way to geography I heard footsteps behind me and it sounded as if someone was trying to sneak up on me.
    • Finally she heard a faint footstep, a click-clacking of undoubtedly expensive shoes that grew heavier as they came nearer.