There are 2 main translations of fray in Spanish

: fray1fray2

fray1

deshilacharse, v.

Pronunciation: /freɪ//freɪ/

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (collar/rope/cloth) deshilacharse
    (wire) pelarse
    • He had a long black coat that trailed the floor slightly, the edges torn and frayed, obviously often used.
    • Often the chimps modified the fishing probe, pulling it through their teeth to fray the end like a paintbrush.
    • Trevelyan himself was present, bent with age, his musty gown fraying at the edges - emblematic, I remember thinking, of an old order passing.
    • Moreover, overlocking seams and hemming garments are not necessary because the fabric doesn't fray.
    • At intervals of around 2 inches there is fraying all along the edges of the collar and sleeves.
    • The cheap, no-frills fix is to simply melt the end of the frayed shoelace with the lighter.
    • The moist tawny plumpness of the peaches, dabbled with thick but scratched crimson so that they look like frayed velvet, is further accentuated by the hard cracked shells of the walnuts alongside them on the tablecloth.
    • The hallway was a drab grey and the worn carpet was fraying.
    • Underground cables become frayed from aging, corrosive chemicals, overload or rats biting them.
    • That much was true, but I'd overlooked just how much of the fabric has frayed or worn a little bit, exposing the pure-white threads underneath the blue.
    • This fabric doesn't fray, comes in a wide array of patterns and solids, and does not need to be hemmed or sewn!
    • ‘Cheap’ thread will fray, break and cause knotting of the thread while sewing.
    • This is a fabric which frays badly and the best way to finish it is to encase those edges within the seams.
    • Ribbons fray over time, and they have to be replaced.
    • Irate motorists who haven't read the highway code I can deal with, being scruffy because my jacket is already fraying at the edges is another matter.
    • First thing that shocks is the decor - everything looks really dated - the sofas seem to be fraying at the edges and the wooden dancefloor is in a poor condition.
    • The paper was thin and the edges were beginning to fray from age.
    • The cloth had frayed at the edges; the tassels had unraveled.
    • At his feet was a strip of dirt colored cloth, frayed at the edges.
    • The girl quickly tucked the blue ends of her hair into her black fraying sweater, concealing them from sight, and jogged up the steps to the church building.
    • Many scientists enter the fray from evolutionary biology, the branch of science that conflicts most directly with religion.
    • There are also rumours that a financial bidder could enter the fray and then sell stores to the supermarket giant, which was very disappointed not be cleared.
    • The second round saw some of the stronger teams from last year's competition enter the fray, and some of the first round qualifiers stepped up their game yet further under the afternoon sun.
    • Overall domestic market share is down and it's recently been falling in the light truck sector, as new foreign competitors enter the fray.
    • As the game progressed I was itching to get a run and with eight minutes to go, I got the nod to enter the fray.
    • I can't wait to enter the fray again, to challenge ignorance, to mock hypocrisy, to defeat a lie.
    • Although it feels like it has been going on for decades, alas, it's still a necessary discussion, and I've been meaning to enter the fray.
    • Old enemies take a stand and strangers enter the fray.
    • It is possible other bidders could enter the fray, if the take-out price is seen as too low.
    • The deal has set the hares running in the industry and some investors are betting a rival suitor, possibly from the US, will enter the fray with a higher offer.
    • But to do that, they would have to want to enter the fray, starting from the bottom and working their way up the pecking order at rock festivals.
    • And later we'll also investigate another energy option keen to enter the fray: geothermal power.
    • Second, will another, more appealing bidder enter the fray?
    • To enter the fray, you need to know the business and have pretty thick skin.
    • It is also expected that some other candidates will enter the fray before convention night.
    • But the fact that she's still willing to enter the fray is in itself a tribute to her survival skills.
    • Day by day, new names enter the fray and it looks as if there will be a bumper number of candidates for the elections to be held on 11 th June.
    • That Aberdeen game saw him enter the fray as a first-half substitute, only to suffer the indignity of being hooked later in the game.
    • I believe he has achieved that - but the big American chemists could still enter the fray.
    • What is really necessary is to curb the number of independent candidates who enter the fray, to no useful purpose.
  • 2

    (become strained)
    tempers were fraying la gente estaba perdiendo la paciencia
    • his nerves are beginning to fray se está empezando a enervar

transitive verb

  • 1

    (cloth)
    (rope/wire) desgastar
    (through use) desgastar
    (through use) raer
    (deliberately) deshilachar
  • 2

    (nerves) crispar

There are 2 main translations of fray in Spanish

: fray1fray2

fray2

refriega, n.

noun

  • 1

    refriega feminine
    lucha feminine
    he's ready for the fray está listo para entrar en la refriega
    • she returned to the fray with renewed enthusiasm volvió al ataque con renovado entusiasmo
    • she joined the fray and gave a brilliant speech salió a la palestra y pronunció un brillante discurso
    • I miss work, but I'm glad to be out of the fray echo de menos el trabajo, pero me alegro de no estar en la brecha