Translation of gaga in Spanish:

gaga

chocho, adj.

Pronunciation: /ˈɡɑˌɡɑ//ˈɡɑːɡɑː//ˈɡaɡə/

adjective

informal

  • 1

    (senile)
    chocho informal
    gagá informal
    to go gaga volverse gagá
    • I hope I'm not around to see it but if I am - too gaga to know what's happening - put me in with the admirers of deeply flawed dreamers.
    • Anita knows people may think she has gone completely gaga when they see her and her partner, a builder from Normanton, tie the knot in a register office in Wakefield, but none of that is going to dissuade her.
    • The U.S. media have gone slightly gaga about what's happening over there in Buckingham Palace.
    • I'm still going to go gaga when I meet a seemingly great guy and want to run off to Vegas with him to be married by an Elvis impersonator.
    • In truth political correctness hasn't so much gone gaga as gone mainstream.
    • This woman who came round is basically a salesperson and managed to sell my Mum an expensive policy handing over ‘power of attorney’ to me and my brother in case my parents both go gaga!
    • They may have the Himalayas in all their splendour laid out before them, walks in pine-scented forests, lakes of a blue you can die for, wild flowers that would make mafia dons go gaga, and what is it that they demand?
    • And the media - that includes me, since I'm writing about it - are gaga.
    • Certain challenges might currently be driving you bananas, but don't get overwhelmed, go gaga and give up - or be goaded into accepting the unacceptable for the sake of peace.
    • To the hard-eyed realists of New Delhi, this book will only be a minor provocation from an old friend of India who has now gone slightly gaga.
    • Ironic, isn't it, that it took a tragedy like the London bombings to illustrate just how completely and inappropriately gaga the British turned eight years ago when Diana died.
  • 2

    (crazy)
    chiflado informal