Translation of goad in Spanish:

goad

acosar, v.

Pronunciation /ɡoʊd//ɡəʊd/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (person) acosar
    (animal) aguijonear
    to goad sb into sth/-ing
    • they tried to goad her into an argument la provocaron para que empezara a discutir
    • she was goaded into doing it tanto la acosaron, que lo hizo
    • In today's fast-paced world, children are goaded to study more and more.
    • Two of the group then approached him, trying to goad him into a fight, then demanded he hand over his Nike sports bag.
    • I swear that the Land Transport Safety Authority is goading us.
    • Still, I haven't found a mobile phone tiny enough to goad me into switching.
    • But in any issue, we should be prepared to think carefully, and not let our reaction to extremists goad us into overlooking any Biblical principles that apply.
    • He's the nasty who goads opponents with vocal insults, and more noticeably, a series of physical kicks and digs when the ball is miles distant.
    • After a certain point, I'd give up, at which point Ed would goad me into another confrontation where he would do the same thing.
    • In his range of interests and enjoyments, he keeps goading me (in a good-natured way) to broaden my own horizons.
    • He insulted me and repeatedly pushed my shoulder, hoping to goad me into hitting him.
    • In between all this, he was busy goading the children to ask questions.
    • Of course in too many cases, if the insurgents bait us and goad us into leveling buildings and homes, the people inside will then hate us (even if they did not before) and we have created more recruits for the guerillas.
    • Of course, she probably only called me to try and goad me into reading her comment and replying (thus completing the cycle and fulfilling the prophecy).
    • But if the writer is attempting to goad me into an abusive response, again, why?
    • I didn't realise that people would attempt to goad us into aggression at regular intervals.
    • At one stage I thought she was deliberately trying to goad him into walking out - but somehow it didn't seem like it was enough.
    • Someone who rubs you the wrong way, who gets on your every nerve, who always seems to be trying to goad you into acts of violence and mayhem?
    • In the new millennium you won't need to fight about spotted owls or old growth or any other flavor-of-the-moment crisis cooked up by environmentalists who are trying to goad you into a fight for the purpose of enriching their coffers.
    • From time to time, their suffering goads working people to revolt.
    • Jones was ecstatic, and started gesturing to a section of Australian spectators who had been goading him, while the rest of the team ran around like headless chickens.
    • When I used to meet him regularly outside the Brompton Oratory after his Sunday devotions, it took little prompting to goad him into a diatribe against his latest enemy.

noun

  • 1

    Farming aguijada feminine
    Farming picana feminine Latin America
    (for elephants) focino masculine
    • These sort of things scare the cattle, and then you have to like do a lot of rough handling to get them to go by there, like a wad of electric goads.
    • Nagasena asks whether then the chariot is the pole, the axle, the wheels,… the reins and the goad all together.
    • Ankusha, the goad held in Lord Ganesha's right hand is used to remove obstacles from dharma's path.
    • His upper right hand holds a goad to remove obstacles from the way as he propels mankind forward on the eternal path.
    • I have a lad driving the oxen with a goad, who is now hoarse because of the cold and from shouting.
    • Below him stands the image of Salim Kumar, the mahout, with his trademark grin and the elephant goad.
    • The spurs on the legs were goads; knee goads, ankle goads, and foot goads.
    • In his upper right hand Ganesha holds a goad, which helps him propel mankind forward on the eternal path and remove obstacles from the way.
    • The mahout directs the elephant using his voice, hands, feet or a goad.
    • The Ripon report suggests widespread use of sticks and electric goads, and says that some animals had to be dragged into and out of trucks and lorries.