Translation of grind in Spanish:

grind

moler, v.

Pronunciation /ɡrʌɪnd//ɡraɪnd/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (wheat/pepper) moler
    (pepper/wheat) (in mortar) moler
    (wheat/pepper) (in mortar) machacar
    (wheat/pepper) (in mortar) triturar
    (meat) moler US
    (meat) picar River Plate US Spain
    (crystals/ore) pulverizar
    • People grind the seed and use the powder to boil the tea.
    • If the root is ground to a powder, as some growers do, it is then boiled to extract the liquorice essence.
    • He grinds pigments to a fine powder, then brushes them onto wet plaster, following the outlines of his sketches transferred earlier.
    • In a mortar and pestle, grind the chilli, salt and shrimp paste.
    • Leaf samples were ground in small mortars in liquid nitrogen.
    • She took to grinding the medication into powder and snorting it.
    • After harvesting, the corn needs to be ground into flour.
    • Millet is ground into flour and made into porridge by boiling it in water.
    • Then the blackened beans are ground in a mortar.
    • Tenant farmers who toiled on the estate were obliged to use the mill to grind their corn.
    • Addicts either swallow the tablets or grind them into powder that can be inhaled or turned into liquid and injected.
    • With so many Mexican items in stores across the US, you can make your own chili powder by grinding your own spices.
    • Then the corn is coarsely ground to break the germ loose from other kernel components.
    • For the chicken, using a mortar and pestle, grind garlic and salt to form a paste.
    • The dried plant material was weighed and then ground finely using a ball mill.
    • The bark is ground to an off-white powder that has a sweet taste and a pinelike odor.
    • The bones are cleaned, toasted in oil and then ground into a powder.
    • Finally, drizzle the whole lot with olive oil and grind black pepper over everything.
    • The bark of this tree is collected fresh, well before the sunrise, and is ground up to make a herbal preparation.
    • You take a handful of each herb, put it in a mortar, and grind it to a powder.
  • 2

    (lens/mirror) pulir
    (knife/blade) afilar
    • Some people actually shave or grind down parts of their skates so that they can fit larger wheels.
    • Next, Tinsley Laboratories will grind and polish the mirrors and finally Ball builds the telescope.
    • The large upright stone also bears the marks of where new adze heads were ground and sharpened.
    • After cooling slowly, the piece is then ground to remove excess enamel, and polished.
    • He studies, grinds and polishes Japanese swords and daggers for sale to museums and private collectors across the world.
    • The generator is a compound surface grinder used to grind curves in the surface of the lens
    • Only in the black leaf bases did they reach the surfaces exposed by grinding off the charcoal.
    • In both operations, cutters had to be removed from the arbors and ground to resharpen.
    • Using a diamond grinder, she ground some of the bones flush with the concrete surface.
    • When carving the background areas, one must be careful not to grind away too much white stone.
    • Unaided by some kind of equipment, a person cannot grind down the surface of a rock; that's why a field geologist carries a hammer.
  • 3

    to grind sth into sth
    • he ground the cigarette end into the carpet incrustó / aplastó la colilla en la alfombra
    • to grind the faces of the poor into the dust oprimir a los pobres
  • 4

    Dentistry
    to grind one's teeth bruxar

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (move with friction)
    rechinar
    chirriar
    the wheels of bureaucracy grind very slowly las cosas de palacio van despacio
    • the talks ground on for weeks las conversaciones continuaron a trancas y barrancas durante varias semanas
    • The justice system grinds slowly and gets off to many a false start, but it ends up triumphant.
    • Three-wheeled beach vans selling everything from cigarettes to cakes grind their way through the sand.
    • He can then grind slowly westwards, picking up centres as the rest fight amongst themselves.
    • That horrid smell, that horrid noise; the hissing of the wheels grinding over the asphalt road, that drilling noise.
    • The elevator grinds loudly, about to reach the limit of its ascent.
    • The platform rose, grinding loudly as it went, reminding the girl that there was something else that needed fixing besides her bike.
    • I would sit on the roofs of listing, overloaded trucks grinding up and down hundreds of switchbacks across the gorge-scarred Yunnan province.
    • We've descended with him in an old cage lift that grinds and lurches down a shaft sunk in 1885.
    • It was a slow day at work on the Monday before Melbourne Cup and the wheels of the Victorian bureaucracy were grinding slower than usual.
    • Remember, the wheels of the justice system can grind very slowly, at least in the US.
  • 2informal

    (study hard)
    estudiar mucho
    darle duro al estudio Latin America
    empollar Spain informal
    tragar River Plate informal
    matearse Chile informal
    • Christina and Toby stood up, went to the dance floor and started grinding.
    • He laughed and moved to grind with the scarily leggy female.
    • Everyone was dancing and grinding in very unusual ways.
    • She crawled on top of him and started dancing and grinding slowly on top of him.
    • Jude glanced around, seeing Andy grinding with some girl who was not Claudia.
    • Both get to grind against some scantily clad girls.
    • Very simple, very direct, able to make you move and grind.
    • Jack knew that Angela wasn't the type of girl to grind while dancing, and he doubted whether she knew how to.
    • I was not surprised as I saw Melissa grinding with Alex on the dance floor.
    • By the time I caught up to her, it was to behold the sight of her and Jake making out and grinding to the music.
    • Soon she's balancing dance lessons with recording sessions and grinding with boy-band superstars, even her lifelong crush.
    • Some guy moved in behind me and started to grind against me.
    • People were bumping and grinding together on the dance floor and others were either making out in a free corner or sitting and trying to have a conversation.
    • People were grinding, and just dancing, holding beers in their hands.
    • Although the video did have a lot of ‘bloke appeal’, with the singer and her dancers grinding and gyrating from start to finish, I got the impression that it was all her idea.
    • I actually ended up dancing - grinding - with my Aunt Carolyn's date, Jake.
    • He escorted me down a narrow hall and back to the party, where I was met with many people dancing and grinding to some music that got on my nerves.

noun

  • 1informal

    (drudgery)
    trabajo pesado masculine
    rollo masculine informal
    paliza feminine informal
    back to the daily grind! ¡de vuelta al yugo!
    • All the worries, all the tears and anger and stress, the relentless grind of her life - gone.
    • A friend of mine has escaped the daily grind for a jaunt to Paris.
    • I understand that retirement can be a major shock to the system if you have been used to working for your living and coping with the pressures and aggravations of the daily grind.
    • It's time to take a break from the normal grind, slow down, take it easy, and of course… listen to relaxing music.
    • The work should pay off during the grind of August and September.
    • Others ditch the daily grind for a slower-paced life.
    • It's like taking a step away from the daily grind, the hard slog, the trials and the tribulations so you can focus on nothing but having fun for three whole days.
    • It was a hell of a lot of fun for a while, but eventually turned into a grind.
    • But it is a tough grind for the animals and the men.
    • Some say the grind of the season will break you down mentally.
    • And it gave his life a drastic turn, pulling him away from the ulcerating grind of a big-city businessman.
    • Each worker has a tale of hard work, staff shortages and the daily grind to survive.
    • Such preseason work will pay off through the grind of a long season.
    • Work is turning into a grind with 3 projects on the go.
    • His decision to give up the daily grind was made when he took 10 weeks off in the summer of 2001 to ponder the future.
    • Escaping from their day-to-day grind was the sole reason for signing up in the first place.
    • Her working life is a relentless grind, just as it is for many working people.
    • She feels that her job has freed her from both the grind of the touring lifestyle and pressures she would face to tailor her work to the tastes of out-of-town presenters.
    • For most working women, it is a long, hard grind.
    • Feel the need to escape the daily grind?
  • 2US informal

    (over-conscientious worker)
    she's the office grind es la niña aplicada de la oficina ironic
    • You sound like a total grind. Like you never skipped a class the day after a party.
    • In a class full of grinds that sent more than eighty kids on to Ivy League schools each year, he finished first, effortlessly, and sailed through Harvard with equal ease.
    • About 1957, MIT undergraduates began referring to ‘gnurds,’ studious grinds, especially in science and engineering.
    • In gymnastics, like in school, there are grinds who learn everything by rote.
    • She is an insufferably sensible young woman — a grind at school, hiding behind thick glasses and inside bulky cardigans.
  • 3Irish

    (private classes)
    clases particulares feminine
    • The rich can afford to send their children to fee-paying schools and then top that up with grinds to get them into the best courses.
    • The top schools cater for a cohort of students whose parents can afford to pay for grinds and revision courses.
    • If even half of Leaving Cert students were paying for grinds at this rate of €45 per hour, it would make the industry worth €50 million a year.
    • Expensive grinds and extra tutorial classes also feature in today's lifestyle of even the youngest students.
    • Therefore, in a school that sends a large percentage of its students to university, the majority of those students may have had grinds.