Translation of highbrow in Spanish:

highbrow

de intelectual, adj.

Pronunciation: /ˈhaɪˌbraʊ//ˈhʌɪbraʊ/

adjective

  • 1informal

    (tastes) de intelectual
    (music/art) para intelectuales
    • There are lots of people trying to dumb down, trying to make highbrow stuff more real, more visceral.
    • I was going to say that it is not the type of book that I would normally have much time for, because it is published by Bloomsbury, and their stuff is usually a bit highbrow for me.
    • He has inexpensive tastes, even if he likes highbrow culture, and has the common touch.
    • Now a series of reports questioning his ability to deliver highbrow culture into the establishment may have damaged his reputation.
    • People who think that he should make the International Festival more populist, as opposed to highbrow, have clearly missed the point.
    • I think that artists and the cultural sector can often seem unnecessarily highbrow.
    • Although the ballet may not receive great acclaim from highbrow ballet lovers, it has had 6,000 performances overseas and organizers are confident Chinese audiences will respond warmly.
    • This sort of evening is not for highbrow music lovers, but for people who enjoy listening to ‘normal’ Christmas carols.
    • That's obviously too highbrow a concept for them to comprehend.
    • With all due respect the Yeats Summer School is a bit highbrow, appeals only to the few, and is generally regarded as a tourist attraction.
    • This year, the ceremony was broadcast live on arts channel BBC4, a channel so highbrow it has about six viewers.
    • In the decades that followed, it developed as a popular alternative to a highbrow arts festival: a jamboree of artistic experiment and innovation.
    • So, if you thought ‘Ulysses’ was only for highbrow academics, come along and be prepared to be pleasantly surprised!
    • But I'd have to say the blogosphere and Internet has given City Journal, a pretty highbrow magazine overflowing with thoughtful, long essays, a lot more readers.
    • Philippe Garrel is also one of those figures: a director with fanatic followers in the most highbrow circles of film criticism.
    • The content, however, seems less highbrow than one might have feared.
    • Woke up this morning to a very highbrow debate on Radio National between George Monbiot, Christopher Hitchens and Lewis Lapham on the death of the Left.
    • It certainly isn't that we are particularly highbrow - I love intellectual stuff, but also Friends, chick lit and most films with Meg Ryan in.
    • I hate this attitude that classical music or the arts have to be highbrow.
    • Their literature sections are supposedly quite highbrow, but they still have lots of popular stuff.

noun

  • 1informal

    (masculine and feminine) intelectual feminine