Translation of hurdy-gurdy in Spanish:

hurdy-gurdy

organillo, n.

Pronunciation /ˈhəːdɪˌɡəːdi//ˈhərdiˌɡərdi/

nounPlural hurdy-gurdies

  • 1

    organillo masculine
    • The four-piece Quebecois band will be bringing hurdy-gurdies, fiddles, accordions, guitars, and lots of toe-tapping reels and two-steps to the stage, along with waltzes and ballads that will surely help you shake off the cold.
    • Traditional folk instruments include the bandura, a variety of flutes, various fiddles and basses, drums and rattles, the bagpipe, the hurdy-gurdy, the Jew's harp, and the hammered dulcimer.
    • A dance that probably originated in the Auvergne, where it was accompanied by such folk instruments as the musette or the hurdy-gurdy.
    • The instrument is a hurdy-gurdy, a pear-shaped fiddle having strings that are sounded not by a bow but by the rosined rim of a wooden wheel turned by a handle at the instrument's end.
    • Leopold Mozart, when he wasn't raising his son Wolfgang Amadeus, wrote several concert works for unusual instruments, including the bagpipes and the hurdy-gurdy.