Translation of liana in Spanish:

liana

liana, n.

Pronunciation /liˈɑnə//liˈænə//lɪˈɑːnə/

noun

Botany

  • 1

    liana feminine
    • These features, and very different life forms ranging from trees and lianas to annuals, occur within closely related groups.
    • Throughout the homeland of the Penan, sago and rattan, palms, lianas, and fruit trees lie crushed on the forest floor.
    • The going was tough with tangled lianas and stubborn brambles clutching at my clothes.
    • Underneath a big tree are various other plants, shrubs, liane, and so on, forming an interacting ecological structure.
    • They are generally considered to be small, scrambling lianas or possibly shrubs.
    • Bunched optical fibers and acrylic light ducts draped like lianas from the ceiling, pulsing with digital information.
    • Some of the leaves documented in this selection were from lianas grown in this way.
    • Finally, this work represents part of a long-term research effort in which mechanical architectures are being investigated in terms of the evolution of architectures of trees, shrubs, lianas and procumbent growth forms.
    • Tropical forest foragers fashion their own nets from lianas, and make belt pouches, baskets, and mats from grasses.
    • Once exposed to full sunlight at the top of the canopy, lianas often flower and fruit prolifically.
    • In reviewing the features of the leaves of the lianes it is seen that there are many characters common to them all.
    • The results show no evidence of a bimodal distribution of vessel lengths as observed for lianas and several other species.
    • The window was blocked completely by a curtain of lianas, and Theo swore he could see a small monkey peering out at him.
    • We spent the next day at another part of the concession, where the path was overgrown and the machete rang like a bell against the lianas.
    • When they reach the top of the canopy they often spread to other trees or wrap themselves around other lianas.
    • Some of the larger woody lianas may exceed 3,000 feet in length.
    • Only 5% of the woods were identified as lianas, whereas 43% of the fruits and seeds have been.
    • The leaves of the understory shrubs, lianas, and sapling trees bear the unmistakable signs of damage by hungry insects.
    • There they climb into a series of wooden constructions three metres high, made with tree trunks lashed together with lianas like tree houses perched above the flood.
    • It is interesting to note that some tropical lianes also grow and flower as shrubs in similar circumstances.
    • Most representatives are lianas, while climbing shrubs and small trees can also be found.
    • A liana climbs its host tree, called a trellis, by laying down a network of tendrils, spikes, and hooks.
    • However, the sapwood of these Actinidia species, as with other lianas, is highly porous with large diameter vessels.