Translation of menace in Spanish:

menace

Pronunciation /ˈmɛnəs//ˈmɛnəs/

noun

  • 1

    • 1.1(threatening quality)

      the menace in his voice el tono amenazador de su voz
      • an air of menace un aire amenazador

    • 1.2(threat)

      amenaza feminine
      to demand money with menaces exigir dinero con intimidación
      • Even more important, they might fail to notice a menace or threat which if not guarded against might harm or even destroy them, their regime, and possibly even the state as well.
      • The man is a menace to everything he once professed to represent, which makes him either delusional or hypocritical.
      • ‘People who drink and drive are a menace to themselves and other road users,’ Mr Diment said.
      • Whooping cough is still a menace to British babies despite widespread use of vaccinations, research revealed yesterday.
      • The council claims skateboarders are a menace to pedestrians and cause damage running in to tens of thousands of pounds.
      • Yes, I was a criminal, a drunk, a drug dealer, an addict and a menace to society.
      • It is an argument for the sensible control of badger numbers so they are once again regarded as an asset to the countryside, not a menace to it.
      • According to police, the scooters, which should only be used on private land, are a menace to pedestrians and motorists.
      • He said various agencies of the Centre and the concerned state police are coordinating to tackle the menace of terrorist funding.
      • However, while sales of the machines are booming, critics claim they pose a menace to riders and pedestrians alike and are destroying the tranquillity of parks and beaches.
      • Leonard was jailed for 13 months after a judge told him he had not only been a danger but a menace to other road users.
      • He was uncompromising and a menace to world peace.
      • During sentencing, Judge Hernandez stated that Diane was dangerous and a menace to society.
      • Stray dogs should not be allowed to roam and be a menace and threat to the public, especially children, the weak and the aged.
      • Although medical treatment has improved in recent times, the disease is still a menace to many people's health.
      • So there I was, behind bars, only 21 but already a dangerous criminal, and a menace to society, according to papers and television.
      • This youth and his family are well known for stealing cars and are nothing but a menace to the community.

  • 2

    • 2.1(danger)

      amenaza feminine
      a menace to sb/sth una amenaza para algn/algo

    • 2.2informal (nuisance)

      peligro público masculine humorous
      he's a little menace! ¡es un diablillo!


transitive verb

literary

  • 1

    amenazar