Translation of mock in Spanish:

mock

burlarse de, v.

Pronunciation /mɒk//mɑk/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (ridicule)
    burlarse de
    mofarse de
    don't mock the afflicted no te burles de las desgracias de otro
    • he mocked her accent imitó / remedó su acento burlonamente
    • The awkwardness between them soon vanished when they began laughing and mocking the poorly produced film.
    • Everyday I had to go through the pain of being mocked and laughed at.
    • But most of all, the politically correct do not like being publicly mocked and revealed as ridiculous.
    • None of the people we get on well with are being treated that badly; hassled a bit and teased and mocked, maybe, but not hit or tripped in the corridors.
    • Later, he had party members laughing as he mocked the premier's economic recovery plan.
    • A very common response to this is essentially to mock this as ridiculous.
    • We may laugh, scowl or mock initially, but eventually we usually recognize them as what they are and move on.
    • The reproach was lightly mocking and they both laughed.
    • Have you no thought of how your children will be mocked and teased by other children when they're at school?
    • Wendy was so supportive as she mocked and laughed at me.
    • We laughed, we mocked, we teased, we made fun of each other, we made fun of strangers.
    • May be it was just because of her bad mood and hopeless situation but it seemed as if they were laughing sinisterly and mocking at her.
    • It was the first time I started laughing and not to mock something.
    • But would you make fun of her, laugh and mock at her?
    • We laugh and mock from the moment of their first appearance.
    • I confess, that while we did not mock, we did laugh out loud at the protesters.
    • I worked in talkback radio for several years and when the microphone is off, people like him are openly mocked and laughed at by the hosts.
    • Today millions of unbelievers sit in front of their TV sets laughing and mocking at what once was considered sacred.
    • Doing so is justifiable cause for being mocked, teased, and otherwise humiliated.
  • 2literary

    (make vain)
    (efforts) burlar literary
    (efforts) frustrar
    • It mocks principles of justice, including basic norms of fairness, as well the underlying basis of contract law, which is the orderly regulation and development of commercial life.
    • His work mocks our desire for a safe, fantasy non-place for our garbage.
    • But if the past is any guide, the left will succeed once again in blocking the nomination of a minority judicial candidate whose success mocks their mantra that minorities can't make it in America.
    • Democracy works by keeping leaders accountable and a campaign that consists of little more than photo opportunities mocks democracy, period.
    • The phenomenon runs deep; it mocks political barriers and reaches all circles.
    • But the ingrained assumption that we are legislator, judge, jury and executioner mocks any notion of global order.
    • But today the daily panic and the long line of citizens testing for anthrax mocks this misplaced confidence.
    • This is the time to decide whether this country and, by logical extension, the fate of the world should be in the hands of a leader whose essential mode of governance mocks the ideals of a free society.
    • The music mocks the pompous words with its crude, plodding scales, and speaks of horror rather than triumph.
    • But the reality on the ground mocks those assertions.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    burlarse
    to mock at sth ridiculizar algo

adjective

  • 1

    (examination/interview) de práctica
    (examination/interview) de prueba
    (outrage/anger) fingido
    (outrage/anger) simulado
    a mock battle/prison break-out un simulacro de batalla/de fuga de una prisión
    • mock satin tela imitación satén
    • mock trial juicio simulado
    • The popularity of this enduring musical is evident in the audience, who clap and cheer every song and gasp in mock horror at the untimely death of one of the heroes at the close of the play.
    • ‘What are you implying,’ roars the actor in mock horror.
    • Last month re-enactors staged a mock battle at the site, as a testing ground before the full festival on September 23 and 24 next year.
    • The final module is on interview preparation, including mock exercises and exam papers.
    • As the cop turns to leave, the punk's screams change from mock protest to real anger.
    • He will be a fine knight, if his show at the mock battle was not a fluke.
    • ‘It's all the things that I find most horrifying,’ says Homes, with mock horror.
    • I sat up so I could see her, a look of mock horror on my face.
    • The competition consists of the school teams going head to head in a mock trial with a real judge acting as adjudicator.
    • Go through a mock interview with a friend or peer.
    • Since then, he has had to undergo a number of interviews, mock breakdown scenarios and mechanical tests.
    • She gasped in mock horror, widening her eyes and her mouth forming an ‘o’ shape.
    • With mock examinations and mid-term breaks over the next few weeks very few games have been arranged.
    • In this mock battle, the men try their best not to get captured.
    • And the Club offer mock interviews to pupils who are preparing to start jobs or university.
    • We ate fish served with a salad and baked potatoes, followed by a dessert of real strawberries in mock cream (made up from powdered milk).
    • She feigned shock and gasped in mock horror.
    • So they put me through a mock interview and at the end of it I was invited and then offered the position.
    • We have mock battles with each other on a daily basis.
    • Mattie gasped, fluttering a hand over his heart, his large eyes growing wide in mock horror.
    • She began to punch and kick the air in mock battle.
    • As groups of youths prepared for a carnivalesque mock battle that was to have been the popular centre-piece for one of these festivals, the celebrations turned into a riot.
    • Matt opened his eyes wide and turned to me in mock horror.
    • Jay widened his eyes in mock horror, holding his hands up in front of his chest.
    • She looked at me in mock horror, and threw her pillow at me.
    • It was armed with a cache of stuffed animals and sparkles with the intent of staging a mock siege of the fenced-in leaders.
    • Holly brought a hand to her mouth in mock horror.
    • They screamed in mock horror when they went past the roaring Abominable snowman and leaned into every turn.
    • Students walked to the stage and faced this mock interview under the full glare of those who had gathered at the college auditorium.
    • The mock smoking group showed higher accuracy after smoking a real cigarette than after mock smoking, however their response times remained unaffected.
    • The boys looked at Will in mock horror and disgust, moving away from Will ever so slightly in supposed contempt.
    • The mock battle began with shots shouted back and forth.
    • The party routinely sets the agenda for new attacks on welfare and immigrants, to which the other parties adapt while holding up their hands in mock horror.
    • Arturo raised his hands to his mouth in mock horror.
    • This video is funny, like the guys on donkeys, but becomes chilling as the children engage in their mock battle.
    • Instead, faces decorated in warrior paint, the participants enact mock battle situations in their movements, exercising their frustrations in a better way.
    • Artificial lakes were often created and ships conducted a mock battle (called the Naumachia).
    • She slapped her hands to her cheeks in mock horror.
    • Various re-enactment groups, from Vikings to 20th century, will liven up the event with mock battles and drills.

noun

  • 1

    to make a mock of sth/sb poner algo/a algn en ridículo
  • 2British

    (exam)
    examen de práctica masculine
    examen de prueba masculine
    • The mocks were soon and if she didn't check this beforehand and it was wrong I'd get a bad mark.
    • She said: ‘I started to do A-levels, but left after the mocks.’
    • ‘Well maybe I've been a bit busy revising because we have the remainder of our mocks in the next week and a half,’ I snapped.
    • I better start revising now, I have a business mock exam tomorrow.
    • And by December, GCSE mocks are being sat before the final exam timetables come through in Spring.
    • But I don't think most of us were surprised by the results because when we did the mocks, we all did pretty badly,’ she said.
    • I once took a couple before a history mock because I'd been up late and it was horrible.
    • I get so stressed taking exams that during my mocks it stopped me sleeping and made me physically sick - how can I control this for the real thing?