Translation of muster in Spanish:

muster

reunir, v.

Pronunciation /ˈmʌstə//ˈməstər/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (sailors/soldiers) reunir
    (sailors/soldiers) llamar a asamblea
    • There will be no holding back by Strange, then, when he musters his troops in September.
    • Even so, when war broke out the British Army could muster only 897,000 men, compared to France's five million.
    • It was universally accepted that an army should be mustered to crush the rebellion, but there was no agreement about entrusting the king with the command.
    • In the Gulf war, the United States first mustered an overwhelming force, prepared a multinational coalition, achieved militarily decisive results and got out quickly.
    • By the time the scattered troops were mustered, the enemy was already returning home and had to be ambushed in passing while laden with plunder.
    • From his pulpit of Madison's First Baptist Church, he preached to regiments being mustered for the Civil War.
    • Despite several prominent speakers it mustered a mass army of fifty.
    • In that battle, Ahab was scarcely able to muster 7,000 soldiers much less any chariots or horsemen.
    • The King's son Edward escaped from imprisonment at Gloucester, and mustered an army.
    • This gave Louis time to muster an army, and on 22 May 1216, he landed at Sandwich.
    • But Brutus, having fled to Sardis, mustered his own army to counter this attack.
    • It hadn't helped that Bad Boy Bobby was now an outlaw - a fugitive rumoured to be mustering the troops in the fearful Deep North.
    • U.S. soldiers are using the army camp as a training center for the new national army being mustered by the interim administration.
    • Then, when he finally mustered his troops, he discovered that only three had any training for their duties.
    • The popular conscript army mustered by revolutionary France would demonstrate its superiority over the state commission style, but its abilities were not immediately apparent.
    • Italy, like Britain, is mustering its troops for a possible war in Iraq.
    • I thought that maybe if I got to the city I could muster an army in order to stand and fight.
    • The present Duke of Atholl, like his ancestors before him, has the rare right of being able to muster his own private army, the Atholl Highlanders.
  • 2

    (succeed in raising)
    (army/team) lograr formar
    if they can muster enough support si logran el apoyo que necesitan
    • the party can muster only a few thousand votes el partido apenas puede obtener / sacar unos pocos miles de votos
    • he gave in with as much grace as he could muster cedió con toda la dignidad de la que fue capaz
    • I mustered (up) the courage to speak my mind me armé de valor para decir lo que pensaba
    • We mustered in small groups in the hall, talking quietly.
    • We muster outside the building which is bright enough to be a beacon.
    • Outside, the crew are mustering for the day's shoot.
    • They mustered, marched on Broadcasting House and, oddly, won.
    • On 21 April hundreds of officers mustered ominously outside Gaza Central Prison in defense of their old commanders rather than the new ones.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (soldiers) congregarse
    • Cameron added: ‘It may also have been a gathering place where the troops mustered, or where they waited before going into battle.’
    • During the mobilization of any Army organization, all personnel are required to muster at a designated site.
    • The royal guard will muster to receive their instructions immediately after battle practice in the museum gardens at 12 noon.
    • In the back was a parking lot and a training field where the diverse and loyal platoons mustered and marched, and where prospective recruits would train to become a National Guardsman.
    • People, especially refugees from the Maine frontier, were all too well accustomed to the sounds of trumpets summoning militiamen to battle, and to the sight of forces mustering to oppose the enemy.
    • I knew the military would take another 24 hours to muster so we decided to fight.
    • The army mustered on 11 March 1296 and the long peace was over.
    • By now, the immediate surroundings were quiet, most of the troops had mustered at the south side of camp in preparation to spring the trap that had been laid.
    • Albanian troops muster at the Mother Teresa Airport in Tirana before embarking for Iraq.

noun

  • 1

    asamblea feminine
    before noun muster parade asamblea de tropas feminine
    • But these guns were supposed to be used only at musters and during emergencies.
    • If one had ‘the common defense of the nation’ in mind when he came to view such musters, it was quickly dispelled as the day turned from muster to picnic to drunken brawl in rather too rapid succession.
    • Obligated militiamen were required to arm and equip themselves, and take part in occasional musters and training sessions.
    • A healthier outlet for these energies was required, and pumping contests became popular events at picnics, holiday parades, county fairs, and militia musters.
    • At several musters the troops held contests, running and wrestling but not shooting.
    • The proprietors ordered the first governor to organize the militia with musters weekly or monthly.
    • Bacon led a large force against the Susquehanna, but the vast majority of his troops had little interest in any military activity beyond the alcohol which accompanied their musters.
    • Still with respect for his age, he was excused most drills, musters and watchkeeping.
    • In essence, if a soldier was not present during muster, he could likely be counted as a casualty.