Translation of nibble in Spanish:

nibble

mordisquear, v.

Pronunciation /ˈnɪb(ə)l//ˈnɪbəl/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (bite)
    mordisquear
    • It's a good idea also to pack a snack of cheese and biscuits to nibble on between wineries - and if you can persuade a teetotal friend to drive you so much the better!
    • I sat nervously nibbling a biscuit and waiting for her response.
    • There it's used as a palate cleanser between bites, but I like to nibble on it all the time at home.
    • I was still nibbling the biscuits as I left for the gym, so was fairly pleased when I weighed myself there to find that I'd dropped 8.5kg in the last two weeks.
    • She broke a cookie in half and nibbled at the edges.
    • Before you nosh on your order, you get to nibble on thin and crispy poppadums brushed with ghee, made even yummier when used to scoop up diced pickled carrots sprinkled with black sesame.
    • Also, fill baggies with your fave snacks so you'll have stuff to nibble on when you get the munchies (pack enough to share).
    • We sipped tea and nibbled biscuits at her white lacy table.
    • So after feeding Alex and getting her dressed, we wandered onto the loggia: me, to do my exercises; her, to nibble on her digestif cracker and enjoy the fresh morning air.
    • In addition, nearly 20 per cent kept something to nibble on - a wedding cake, a pork pie and Chinese herbal tablets were among foodstuffs found.
    • My poor peppers and chillies look miserably like they've been nibbled at, except there isn't actually any leaf missing.
    • I assumed these were for guests, to nibble on while they waited, but I still picked up a few, from time to time, on my way out.
    • Grey-skinned office refugees fill Edmonton's Churchill Square, the bright midday sun forcing them to squint as they nibble on their pallid tuna sandwiches.
    • And there'd better be something to drink - at least something small to nibble on, depending on the hour of the night or morning.
    • If you suffer from morning sickness, try the following home remedies: nibble on a ginger biscuit before getting up and try to eat a little something often - perhaps a biscuit, oatcake or crispbread.
    • The waiter is going to get just one more positive mention since he bought me a complimentary almond tuille from the in-house organic bakery, to nibble on whilst everyone else finished up with coffee.
    • Though you nibble on just two or three cookies at a time, the night always ends with a box as empty as the 1,440 cookie calories you consumed.
    • If you are a nut fan like me pistachios are a great buy as they are low in saturated fat and naturally cholesterol free - great served in fruit salad, added to mixed vegetables, rice pasta or couscous or just on hand to nibble on.
    • Next I nibble on the chocolate cookie, reminding myself of the rabbit I had when I was younger.
    • In the afternoons, one can visit local gardens, play croquet, sit amidst the blooming azaleas, nibble on some Devonshire tea, and adamantly wish for a quick death.
  • 2

    (eat, pick at)
    picar
    • The soup is also filling me up, which is a good thing, as it means I'm not nibbling through the afternoon.
    • All the tables outside pubs will already have been hijacked by extended families nibbling and picnicking, which is just unpleasant.
    • Rats and guinea pigs nibble and graze continuously without well-defined meal times.
    • One of the high points for me was standing at the squirrel feeding station and watching two red squirrels, one still young, playing and nibbling without a worry - a rare treat these days.
    • There is kitchen fare perfect for late-night nibbling, and a very substantial brunch buffet every Sunday.
    • The kitchen's been abuzz with everybody chopping, nibbling and stirring pots.
    • Feeding on the growth of after work drinking and nibbling, chicken appetizers are gaining strength based on contemporary Mexican and Asian recipes.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (bite, gnaw)
    to nibble at/on sth mordisquear algo
  • 2

    (eat)
    picar

noun

  • 1

    (bite)
    to have a nibble at sth mordisquear algo
    • We drifting around for a bit, moving from spot to spot trying to find some poor fish that would be stumped by our dying worms and take a bigger bite that just a nibble.
    • I skipped starters and had the goulash soup instead, but had a nibble at the other two's plates.
    • She was giggling, occasionally giving him a kiss, a nibble.
    • A mile off the Ft. Lauderdale coast, mom and daughter dropped their baited lines, hoping for a nibble from grouper or triggerfish to take home for dinner.
    • Yesterday, the stylus of an observatory seismograph continued to jiggle every few seconds like the end of a fishing rod reacting to nibbles.
    • The thing about nibbles is that no matter how tiny they are, each takes a bite out of one's credibility.
    • For those of us hopeless optimists for whom every nibble is surely an interested salmon, the fly can seem sterile.
    • The dismantling of misconceptions and hype often starts not with a lacerating bite, but with tiny nibbles that are easy to ignore, laugh at and explain away.
    • We even dived into the waters of the Blue Lagoon Caves, only to be driven out again by the irritating nibbles of water-fleas.
    • Meanwhile, just down the river, a white father and son are fishing for food and not getting a nibble.
    • It was very relaxing to watch the boats go by with their night lanterns on and on occasion feel the nibble from the fishing rod hoping you would catch the big one.
    • Like Lawson, she responds with semi-delirium to certain tastes, and makes breathless lowing noises between nibbles.
    • It means drawing a baited line through the water and waiting for a nibble.
    • I think the jury system is going to survive, with nibbles taken out of it.
    • Just a nibble on a Rich Tea biscuit in the morning would soon banish the malaise.
    • And he proceeded to tickle her with nibbles up and down her wrist and fingers.
    • You have to rely on senses and a vague idea about what a fish eating a worm feels like through the line, and what it looks like as the nibble bends the tip of your rod.
    • He said anyone who goes through what he did without even getting a nibble from a fish on his line deserves his money back.
    • With a teasing nibble to Shanza's earlobe, he trailed feather soft kisses down her jaw-line.
  • 2

    (in fishing)
    I didn't get a nibble all afternoon no picaron en toda la tarde
  • 3nibbles plural
    informal

    (party snacks)
    cosas para picar feminine
    botanas feminine Mexico
    • The book launch itself was a study in Wellington writers and readers: equal parts present, they filled up the bookshop until there was no elbow room at all and the staff serving nibbles had to hold the trays high above their heads.
    • Hopefully there was a stopover at Jim's Place, Stuart's Well, for hot toddies and nibbles, the last sign of running water for a while and maybe Dinky, the resident dingo, crooned a special early song for them all.
    • We cleaned Sainsbury's out of booze and party food, so when the guests, mostly Cello's colleagues, started to arrive, they were greeted by a table groaning with nibbles and intoxicants.
    • Keep your distance from the nibbles, buffet table or food table.
    • The food is simple but good, usually a formidable steak from MacEwans Meats on 17th Avenue S.W., cooked by you to your liking and served with various nibbles from the Italian market.
    • And I bet they serve cheesy nibbles and M & S roulade.
    • There's a candle-lit Garden in summer and the 1894 Food and Wine Cellar for wines by the glass and deluxe nibbles under more candles, barrels and bare brickwork every night.
    • Entry fee of $25 per team includes lunch and after game nibbles.
    • We could maybe build a robot like Elliott, but it would have a terrible time, paralysed by indecision and pretty useless at bringing us the right bowl of nibbles when we needed it.
    • They promise free wine and festive nibbles and 10% off everything.
    • But instead of resorting to the sort of supermarket canapés that are served with inevitable monotony at so many parties, why not opt for home-made nibbles, which also work out far cheaper.
    • After the business was finished members had nibbles and their customary glass of wine.
    • We were at Jacqui & Ian's house last night and as nibbles they had bought a Sainsburys product called ‘Chips and Dips’.
    • Sipping a sundowner and tucking into homemade nibbles on one of the islands in the river before returning after dark to a hot shower under the stars was an unforgettable experience.
    • Seated at long, wooden tables and benches, with cursory nibbles and an endless supply of dry and medium delights, you'll find this is a great place to meet new best friends - for as long as the tasting lasts at least.
    • I rather like that idea, that a tray of tasty little nibbles might be passed around in the middle of the service. Maybe offering some light refreshments during church services would be a good idea.
    • The next three floors are a whirl of bedrooms, bathrooms and dressing rooms before we arrive at the drawing room, which has its own kitchen area so that the staff don't have to slog up the stairs with the pre-dinner nibbles.
    • There is also a vast range of complimentary nibbles left in each room, such as tablet, shortbread and fruitcake; all home-made and all delicious.
    • My father, being a senior consultant in a busy hospital, dragged us around the wards to spread good tidings to patients and to munch the array of nibbles in the nurses' rooms.
    • Tickets are £5 each, and will include a memento of the occasion and a finger buffet / nibbles.