Translation of nomenclature in Spanish:

nomenclature

nomenclatura, n.

Pronunciation /nə(ʊ)ˈmɛŋklətʃə//ˈnoʊmənˌkleɪtʃər//ˈnəʊmənˌkleɪtʃə/

noun

  • 1

    nomenclatura feminine
    • No consistent system of nomenclature has emerged for the description of stromatoporoid external morphology.
    • A few years ago they started a system of plate nomenclature - three letters, three numbers.
    • The topics in those categories that were less widely dispersed throughout the curriculum included stereochemistry, drug design, drug nomenclature, natural products and biotechnology.
    • We follow the general rules of zebrafish nomenclature for designating locus and allele names.
    • In phylogenetic nomenclature, taxon name definitions are based on ancestry and descent rather than the possession of subjective ‘key’ characters.
    • Various aspects of nomenclature, classification, pathogenesis, antifungal therapy, laboratory methods and associated terminologies have been suitably updated.
    • Each type of study has produced its own system of nomenclature and, hence, classification.
    • Chapter 2 provides an informative and readable summary of nomenclature covering the rules and concepts of the zoological and botanical codes and their relation to stability.
    • These set guidelines and publish a reports containing the rules of nomenclature.
    • The gene nomenclature follows the rules for gene symbols in wheat.
    • For reasons given by Nevo, we will follow the traditional nomenclature, which considers separate taxa.
    • What we need is a return to industry-wide nomenclature for malicious code; used by all vendors and facilitating the reporting, analysis, and resolution of such outbreaks.
    • And, again as with wine, a whole complex system of nomenclature and description has grown up.
    • Jemima Lewis in the Telegraph makes some telling points about journalistic iconography and scientific nomenclature.
    • As usual, we must begin with a careful study of nomenclature, using well-established rules of anatomical deconstruction.
    • Then, as now, type specimens constituted the fundamental entity upon which species are described according to the rules of zoological nomenclature.
    • In conclusion, White's insistence on the need for consistency in mineral nomenclature is important, and, over time, I suspect that many of the problems he identifies will be sorted out.
    • As concerns nomenclature, inadvertently, Professor Judson fails to follow his own advice, no doubt because he is a historian, not a biologist.
    • The Levinson system of nomenclature was proposed originally for rare-earth minerals in order to avoid a proliferation of trivial names.
    • Official codes of nomenclature continue to enforce this rule - one name, one species - although rooting out synonyms and homonyms is a constant struggle.