Translation of notate in Spanish:

notate

hacer una anotación en, v.

Pronunciation: /nəʊˈteɪt//ˈnoʊteɪt/

transitive verb

  • 1

    Music
    hacer una anotación en
    • As a result, notated bar lines may not match up to the bar lines one hears.
    • He even notated the rhythms of his music out loud, something all tap dancers do in their heads.
    • The 31 notated Sonatas represent Gunnar Johansen's great contribution to the performing repertoire.
    • A student who has a solid grasp of rhythm and pulse is much more likely to correctly notate the pitches of a melody.
    • I think that notated music is very undervalued right now, for all sorts of reasons.
    • He also creates a rubato feel, carefully notated by his tempo indications.
    • ‘Dancing Raindrops’ encourages musical artistry with phrases notated with crescendo and decrescendo throughout.
    • I would have liked to see some notated musical examples from time to time.
    • Her dances are notated and recalled through the narratives that underlie the process, rather than specific movements.
    • It was during the 60s and 70s that Feldman began meticulously notating rhythms and durations; earlier works gave the performers more freedom in these areas.
    • I should mention that I found at least two wrongly notated rhythm patterns.
    • I spent hours and hours, taking down her every word of reminiscence, all the folksongs she knew, and then had a music-teacher friend, notate the music.
    • A fully realized score, completely notated by the composer, is required.
    • However, as filming techniques became both cheaper and simpler many companies and institutions started to preserve dance on film in order to complement notated records of choreography.
    • Although he died in 1994, he had been unable to compose or even notate music since around 1985.
    • The scores vary from painstakingly notated jazz moves through pieces that signpost various musical options.
    • Many of these sounds could not even remotely be notated on the music staff.
    • Kagel began to manipulate props, lighting and texts like musical motifs, and to notate movements and gestures as most composers would notate pitch and rhythm.
    • Many of the authors seem to consider ethnomusicology and ethnochoreology ‘scientific’ disciplines whose goal is to objectively record and notate music and dance genres.
    • Some arrangements include jazz solos, and since they are notated, they allow the classical pianist to study their construction.