Translation of nuisance in Spanish:


Pronunciation: /ˈn(j)usəns//ˈnjuːs(ə)ns/


  • 1

    (occurrence, thing)
    to be a nuisance ser un incordio Spain
    • what a nuisance ¡qué fastidio!
    • before noun the strikes had considerable nuisance value las huelgas fueron un gran irritante
    • Dogs are barred from many public places because they pose a serious hazard to health and can be a nuisance and danger.
    • The White House listens to these outraged voices but considers them more a nuisance than genuine problem.
    • In so doing they are creating a nuisance for residents, danger for themselves and a hazard for road users.
    • The nuisance and bother that raises its head time and time again in Portlaoise did so again over the weekend.
    • To some of us the rain is merely a nuisance or an inconvenience.
    • It is no good merely viewing the young as a nuisance and a difficulty, especially when most of them are no such thing at all.
    • However, normally these dumped items will be removed during the programmed cleaning schedule or earlier if they are creating a hazard or a nuisance.
    • I live in Beckenham in an area populated by many foxes and, yes, they do sometimes make a nuisance of themselves.
    • There are also some plants brought in because they had a perceived potential use as garden ornamentals, but which have turned out to be pests or nuisances.
    • Bonfires are a general nuisance and serious problem for anyone with a respiratory condition such as asthma or emphysema.
    • Many felt it would be a nuisance and potentially dangerous.
    • As a result, ministers are going to great lengths to point out that the deer is a fine animal, and must not be viewed as a pest or a nuisance.
    • We are trying our best to stop this problem but it is a nuisance and an inconvenience.
    • In return, they don't secede or otherwise make a nuisance of themselves.
    • But those for whom enjoyment develops into aggression need to be weeded out before they can start to make a nuisance of themselves.
    • If the newcomers wanted to make a go of it here and did not make a nuisance of themselves, they could be Australians.
    • The mechanically-propelled ones with an engine make a noise, are a nuisance and are dangerous.
    • They don't want to go along to annual general meetings and make a nuisance of themselves.
    • The courts tend to approach the question of the existence of a nuisance, whether public or private, as a question of fact.
    • What constitutes a statutory nuisance is carefully defined in section 79 and so too are numerous exceptions.
    • They range from minor noise nuisance, through to serious racial harassment and threats to kill.
    • Parents whose children cause a public nuisance are likely to receive a warning letter from the police.
    • Picketing accompanied by violence, or even merely noise, may be a private nuisance.
  • 2

    pesado masculine
    pesada feminine
    incordio masculine Spain informal
    stop being a nuisance! déjate de molestar
    • he's always making a nuisance of himself siempre está dando la lata
  • 3

    a public nuisance una alteración del orden público