There are 2 main translations of pit in Spanish

: pit1pit2

pit1

hoyo, n.

Pronunciation /pɪt//pɪt/

noun

  • 1

    • 1.1(hole)

      (in ground) hoyo masculine
      (in ground) pozo masculine
      (for burying) fosa feminine
      (as trap) trampa feminine
      (as trap) fosa feminine
      (de caída) (for jumping) foso masculine
      the bear/snake pit el foso de los osos/las serpientes
      • a bottomless pit un pozo sin fondo
      • eating again? you're a bottomless pit! ¿otra vez comiendo? ¡tú eres un barril sin fondo!
      • He promptly drove into a huge, open manure pit.
      • Freed, he swung his legs up and over the pit's edge, breaking the ankle of the would-be killer.
      • First he put a bunch of stones in a big fire, then he put the stones in a pit dug in the ground, put stones over the top, and covered it with moss, sticks and sand.
      • Squeezing through the hole we entered an even larger cave filled with burial pits.
      • The other child fell into an open slurry pit.
      • He accidentally fell into a pit and suffered multiple fractures in his spinal cord.
      • I do not see any risk of these pits becoming breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
      • He gulped as he crawled down the side of the deep pit.
      • Two black bear skulls were recovered from deep roasting/refuse pits located only about 20 m apart.
      • The huge pit, 30 metres deep and the size of ten football pitches, will be crammed full of household and business waste and will take just two years to fill up.
      • All bodies should be buried in deep pits outside of the village and their clothes should also be burnt.
      • Imagine two roads: one smooth, well-paved, well-maintained, the other lumpy and full of cracks and pits.
      • On Michael's instructions, Barry had dug a pit two feet deep and two feet square.
      • Others excavated rifle pits where the ground was soft enough for digging.
      • Below, the stream tumbles noisily into a large pit broken by an enormous spike of rock.
      • The excavations have exposed two Norman rubbish pits containing twelfth-century ceramics and animal bones.
      • The pit is very deep and is always filled to the brim with leaves.
      • Edwards is attacked and thrown into some sort of pit.
      • A pit is dug in the ground and filled with rocks, and meat and vegetables are placed into it.
      • The burial pits contain approx. 6,000 life size figures.

    • 1.2also inspection pitMotor Vehicles

      foso masculine
      fosa feminine River Plate

    • 1.3(hell)

      the pit el infierno

  • 2

    • 2.1(coalmine)

      (de carbón) mina feminine
      before noun pit worker minero masculine
      • Just nine deep pits survive in operation today.
      • Union leaders claim there are at least 90m tonnes of unworked coal still in the pit that could take the best part of 20 years to mine.
      • Their lives are governed by steam whistles that summon them to the pits.
      • We launched a campaign to persuade the Government and UK Coal to keep the pits open, but it seems to have failed.
      • Anyone who has ever been down a pit returns to the surface with deep respect for those who make a career of mining.
      • A decade ago, 15,000 miners worked in the coal pits; today there are less than 4,000.
      • Slag heaps from dozens of coal pits dot the countryside.
      • The first of Selby's three deep pits, Wistow, is due to close by Christmas, followed by the other two, Stillingfleet and Riccall, next year.
      • By this time next year there will only be seven deep coal mining pits left in this country.
      • In 1759 he was put in charge of the duke of Bridgwater's canal between his coal pits at Worsley and Manchester.
      • Seven pits are scheduled for closure in the region, and 35,000 jobs will be lost.
      • In the field on top of the brow was a ventilation shaft which descended to the depths of the coal pit below.
      • In the last 18 months alone, it is understood the pit has lost an average of £1m each month.
      • The pit closures that followed the strike saw communities dispossessed of their living.
      • A grim future awaits the area if the pits are allowed to go under.
      • We also had a mining industry until the pit closures.
      • We surveyed 16 large collieries, each with many pits and a working force of at least 100 miners.
      • Before the establishment of regular roads and a turnpike system the transportation of coal from the pit was the main impediment to expansion.
      • The lack of regulation and enforcement of safety standards led to thousands of deaths in coal pits.
      • Theirs is an uncomplicated life of going down the pit, entertaining at working men's clubs, and hard drinking.

    • 2.2(quarry)

      cantera feminine
      • Most of my fishing with this float is on large gravel pits that tend to be rather deep, demanding the use of a sliding float.
      • After the arrival of Westerners, the tar from these pits was mined and used for roofing.
      • The lake, irregularly shaped and nearly ninety feet deep in some spots, was formerly a gravel pit.
      • Stone from this pit was a deep, rich chocolate brown and was certainly the most popular stone with both the contractor and the public.
      • The quarry pits aroused the curiosity of the first European-American settlers on the ridge at the beginning of the nineteenth century.
      • The trailer park is set around some flooded gravel pits.
      • I also intended fishing another small gravel pit, a pit hardly fished but from which I'd heard rumours of tench to over 8 pounds.
      • Grown on a disused china clay pit, the project has helped regenerate the area.
      • With hand tools we worked into the banks of the broad, shallow, open pits that exploited the deposit.
      • When the season for quarrying began, the pits sprang to life and the pace continued rapidly until the first deep frost at which time quarrying ceased.
      • We do have 40 acres of land containing overgrown colliery shale, fly tipping and flooded clay pits.
      • As quarrying expanded, five pits were eventually opened.
      • The gravel pit was dug in the river's flood plain.
      • For the next six months while the pit was being mined, Green Hill produced about 180 specimens of wire gold on crystallized quartz.
      • A wetlands conservation project in old quarries and gravel pits in North Yorkshire has won a national award.
      • New gravel pits have been excavated along the Hudson Bay coast to supply material for road and runway construction.
      • Each hollow is the partly infilled remains of an extraction pit or mine shaft cut through the chalk to reach seams of flint below.

  • 3orchestra pit

    • 3.1Theatre

      foso orquestal masculine
      foso de la orquesta masculine

    • 3.2Theatre History
      (stalls)

      platea feminine
      • This rough, loose, prickly coat allowed the Shar-Pei to wriggle out of its opponent's grasp while fighting in the dog pits.
      • The amorous fops in the box are more refined and distant from the show than the working class audience in the pit.
      • Perhaps we should bring back badger-baiting, cock-fighting, the bear pit, and all of those other traditional English pursuits.
      • There were still tip up wooden seats in the pit and benches in the gallery.
      • What's it like to sit in the pit in the Chicago Theater?
      • At ten to eight, the house doors opened, and there was a rush for the sixpenny seats in the pit.
      • I heal the animals that fight in the pit… so long as there's enough left to heal.
      • At each fighting session, the animals are paired off against each other in a small pit or arena, enclosed by plywood or galvanised walls.
      • In such contests, according to law-enforcement officials, two dogs are placed in a pit or similar area enclosed with plywood walls.

  • 4US

    (in Stock Exchange)
    parqué masculine
    • Trading was conducted by traders on the floor of the pit calling out and signalling to each other.
    • Most traders trade in a pit, sitting almost on top of each other where everyone can be seen and heard and all calls traced and deals marked.
    • Flat-screen displays ring the pits set up with trading data.
    • Although no one expects the euro to collapse, the debate is contributing to an uncertain atmosphere in foreign-exchange trading pits.
    • Even now, many traders make electronic trades on handheld devices when they're in the pits.
  • 5pits plural

    • 5.1(in motor racing)

      the pits los boxes

    • 5.2slang (the very worst)

      the pits los boxes

  • 6

    (on face)
    marca feminine
    cicatriz feminine
    • Dozens of deep scars and pits ran across the length its snout.
    • If you don't have problem skin, you're missing out on something really special; pits and blemishes add such character, don't they?
    • Sometimes, popping a pimple will cause a brown or red scar to form that could last months; and scars, in the form of dents and pits, can last forever.
    • I have many acne pits of varying sizes on my face.
    • Dents or pits in the skin can easily become filled with bits of skin and hair, and infected with bacteria.
  • 7British slang

    (bed)
    cama feminine
    • The skin in my pits started peeling off!
    • Once home we shuffled off to our respective pits, I surfaced at 10.30 am.
    • I’d relaxed in my illness and wallowed in my pit and on the sofa.
    • Mark was still in his pit, although he was awake.
    • Get up out of your pit you lazy woman.
    • Assuming you can drag yourself out of your pit by about 10am, you should be in reasonable shape.
    • Make sure your pits are very dry before applying deodorant!
    • She turned up at a premiere with hairy pits.
    • When she lifts her arms, she has a big old bushy pit!
    • The cashier had sweaty pits and greasy hair.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (mark)
    (surface/metal) picar
    (metal/surface) marcar
    his face was pitted by smallpox tenía la cara picada de viruelas
    • By pitting metal surfaces, it provides a habitat for scale and bacteria to form.
    • The road leading up to the bridge is pitted with large, deep potholes.
    • Shrapnel scars still pitted the walls and sandbags were stacked around every home.
    • His face was pitted with pockmarks and his beady eyes had come to rest a little below Ashley's throat, making his intentions perfectly clear.
    • The tip of the stick is often driven into the cloth with force, weakening the structure of the weave, and pitting the playing surface.
    • The dirty, white stone front of the shop, which stocked boxes of beer cans, was pitted with bullet holes, while a car and lorry parked in the protected courtyard outside were badly damaged in the attack.
    • Much her chagrin she saw that through the ravages of time it was pitted with holes, some small others rather large.
    • The 22 tiny patches of Martian surface revealed a barren landscape pitted with craters, like the Moon.
    • The way was often both deeply pitted and stony.
    • The road surface is pitted with potholes and strewn with potentially dangerous objects.

transitive verb

US

  • 1

    (remove stone)
    (olive/fruit) quitarle el hueso a
    (olive/fruit) quitarle el cuesco a
    (fruit/olive) quitarle el carozo a Southern Cone
    (fruit/olive) quitarle la pepa a Colombia
    (olive/fruit) deshuesar
    (olive/fruit) descarozar Southern Cone
    pitted cherries cerezas descarozadas feminine Southern Cone
    • Just before serving, peel and pit the avocado.
    • Wash fruits well, pit and peal peaches and core pears.
    • If you're pitting cherries, do it inside a Ziploc bag.
    • I cut the cherries in half and pitted them.
    • Leave some cherries whole so people can see later on how hard you worked pitting real cherries.

There are 2 main translations of pit in Spanish

: pit1pit2

pit2

hueso, n.

Pronunciation /pɪt//pɪt/

noun

US

  • 1

    (in fruit)
    hueso masculine
    cuesco masculine
    carozo masculine Southern Cone
    pepa feminine Colombia