Translation of present-day in Spanish:

present-day

actual, adj.

Pronunciation /ˈprɛznt ˈˌdeɪ//ˌprɛz(ə)ntˈdeɪ/

adjective

  • 1

    actual
    de hoy (en) día
    • It is true that present-day river courses are not wholly natural.
    • There is much misunderstanding about present-day Palestine, some of it amounting to sheer ignorance.
    • For present-day society in the Arab nation that is not the case.
    • The teachings of Jesus Christ are the reasons, basically, for present-day standards of behaviour.
    • The present-day education system hardly resolves the prejudices against the victims.
    • Contemporary plays are also bound by the facts of present-day life.
    • We pity our forebears for the pain and suffering they endured along the way and revel in our comfortable present-day lives.
    • The present-day security employee has to meet a number of serious requirements.
    • The film is a period thriller clearly intended to shed light on present-day problems.
    • Many people die with a minimum of discomfort and distress due to present-day medication and expert care services.
    • Like most elderly folk I find the present-day world much more complicated than that of my early years.
    • Despite all the attractions of present-day living it is good to see the old traditions still strong in the area.
    • The collapse of European fertility rates shows the force of present-day welfare state pressures.
    • In the light of present-day circumstances, old-age homes have to be accepted as an option.
    • Rarely has the church appeared so out of touch with present-day Scotland than it did during the cardinal's sermon.
    • An important feature of present-day globalisation is the advent of a consumer credit society.
    • One of the few fascinations of present-day politics is the stark contrast between the Tory and Labour leaders.
    • But the ancients would hold their own if they could be given the benefits of present-day training and diet.
    • She said that a large proportion of present-day nurses are degree students who have spent more time in a classroom than on the wards.
    • He was also a superb signwriter and used to teach it at the York School of Art in the same building as the present-day Art Gallery.