Translation of rabbit in Spanish:

rabbit

conejo, n.

Pronunciation /ˈræbət//ˈrabɪt/

noun

  • 1

    Zoology
    conejo masculine
    coneja feminine
    (fur/skin) (before noun) de conejo
    rabbit's foot pata de conejo feminine
    • rabbit burrow / hole madriguera de conejo
    • The next day she found the white rabbit still had no food or water.
    • The chances of survival for South Africa's most endangered mammal, the riverine rabbit, looks even more desperate than has commonly been feared.
    • Rodents (except the groundhog) and members of the rabbit or hare families are rarely infected with rabies.
    • In other words, the Amami rabbit has been isolated for so long from other rabbits and hares, including the volcano rabbit, that they are scarcely kin.
    • The large, ever growing incisors in both rabbits and rodents do not undergo functional replacement.
    • Deer, rabbits and foxes came racing out of the woods.
    • They mostly eat rodents, eastern cottontail rabbits, insects, and fruit.
    • Elsewhere, disappearing rabbits can signal declining health of grassland and sagebrush ecosystems.
    • Indeed, meat and pelts are a resource, but rabbits also destroy crops.
    • Foxes, rabbits, harvest mice, house mice, dormice, shrews, weasels, and voles all depend on the hedgerows as a place to breed, hunt or shelter.
    • Most of the animals that participate in the program are dogs and cats - the occasional rabbit and guinea pig are introduced from time to time.
    • They take other small rodents, shrews, rabbits, gophers, bats, and muskrats as well.
    • Appearances were put in by eastern chipmunks, gray squirrels, a rabbit and our new resident woodchuck.
    • It is a patient bird, quite content to sit for hours at a time until a young rabbit, a rat or a mouse chances to pass beneath it.
    • The rabbit was sitting up on its hind legs, still staring at her.
    • The magnificent cats are taking their natural prey, such as deer and rabbits, but discovering also that sheep and cattle and goats are easier to catch.
    • English landowners introduced the European rabbit to the continent in 1859, seeking game animals for sport hunting.
    • Two new extinct species are named (a rabbit and squirrel) and two of the mustelids may represent extinct new species as well.
    • After all, to a shooting man the only good rabbit is a dead rabbit.
    • Deer, hares, rabbits, mice, rats, pigeons, crows and many insects have to be ‘controlled’ in order for these crops to thrive.
  • 2

    (meat)
    conejo masculine
    • Exotic meats such as rabbit, venison and wild boar are available, in addition to countless varieties of sausages.
    • Add the chicken and rabbit and cook until golden brown, about five minutes.
    • Cretan cuisine centres mainly on chicken, pork, lamb, rabbit or fish, served in a variety of non-spicy sauces.
    • I scoffed everything my mother put in front of me - plate-sized Yorkshire puddings, meat and potato pie, rabbit and dumplings, the lot.
    • The game selection in my dish included venison, rabbit and pigeon.
    • My recipe for today is an old Australian country recipe for rabbit pie.
    • This weekend's patrons can expect to be served shrimp bisque or rabbit pie with bay-leaf juice.
    • Hot Cross Bunny turns out to be a recipe for curried rabbit that includes a shot of fiery Thai red curry paste.
    • Wild rabbit has a much darker flesh than farmed rabbit, but both are extremely versatile and, because of the price, you can afford to experiment.
    • Sturdier ones, such as lavender, can be stuffed into chicken or rabbit before roasting, and then discarded later.
    • The document reveals that the bishop's menu would have included a range of meats, from mutton and beef to veal, geese, rabbit, duck and lamb.
    • From every kitchen in the village arose the most delicious aromas: apple pies, rabbit and chicken pies, fairy cakes, pancakes.
    • My main course - confit of wild rabbit with Savoy cabbage and bacon with garlic and parsley mash - looked delectable.
    • The rabbit ballotine was so plain as to be almost unpleasant.
    • If local meat eaters all got hooked on home-grown rabbit, imagine the effect on our food import bill.
    • My other food friend was excited by the presence of rabbit on the menu.
    • I sampled a tender saddle of rabbit, wrapped in fatty Portuguese bacon and doused in a bubbly mustard emulsion.
    • The substantial plate of rabbit was beautifully tender and came with the sort of gloriously rich sauce that you can feel furring up your arteries as you eat.
    • Fuller Pinot styles go well with poached or grilled salmon, foie gras, charcuterie, rabbit, hare, boar and ham.
    • Like lamb cutlets, rabbit joints seem to be made for holding in your hands.
  • 3US

    (in dog racing)
    liebre mecánica feminine

intransitive verb

British
informal

  • 1

    parlotear informal
    darle a la sinhueso informal
    what's he rabbiting on about? ¿qué dice, que no para de hablar?
    • She was in the kitchen when I arrived, simultaneously rabbiting into a mobile phone while watching a soap opera on television.
    • I'm starting to rabbit on now, so I'll stop there.
    • Given half a chance, she's rabbiting passionately about cultural strategies, architectural policies and the thorny problem of getting teenage girls into sport.
    • The rest were rabbiting on about share prices, company takeovers, fashion accessories, holiday destinations or some such guff.
    • While he was rabbiting on about how we would jump off the cliffs at Barnageeragh, I slipped quietly away.
    • She is rabbiting on about antibiotics and bacterial resistance, which have nothing to do with the financial review debate.
    • He answered the shop phone and an executive-type started rabbiting on about buying a laptop computer.
    • Some of you may remember, in the dim and distant recesses of your cobwebbed memory, that last week I was rabbiting on about my son's chums and their abundance of confidence when it came to chit-chatting with adults.
    • As she made her grateful escape, Mum is rabbiting on, ‘I hope she's got a good deodorant on a day like this.’
    • Our mate Robbo came over here for a few weeks last year and when he got back he couldn't stop rabbiting on about the place.
    • There is nothing in Part 1 about pensions, schools, holidays, or whatever he was rabbiting on about.