Translation of ravages in Spanish:

ravages

estragos, n.

Pronunciation: /ˈravɪdʒɪz/

plural noun

  • 1

    (masculine plural) estragos
    the ravages of war/disease los estragos de la guerra/enfermedad
    • his face was marked by the ravages of time el tiempo había hecho estragos en su rostro
    • No more than a shell, it sits almost apologetically, ruined by the ravages of time.
    • And one more thing, how come that Scotland and Wales escape the worst ravages of Global warming?
    • How about a storage system that can withstand the ravages of constant change?
    • Has the Ark, or some of it, survived the ravages of time in some form?
    • Every living creature, including plants, must contend with the ravages of diseases and parasites.
    • Back in 1992, my brother was hospitalized, his body wracked by the ravages of AIDS.
    • When Pensacola suffered the ravages of a fire, the French again sent relief.
    • The only way to escape the ravages of the plague is to find a place the zombies can't reach.
    • Hinduism has survived the ravages of thousands of years in spite of its own inherent weaknesses.
    • Did it all just fall apart, ruined by the ravages of time and neglect?
    • Almost miraculously, these structures were spared the ravages of the 1906 earthquake.
    • No business is spared the ravages of these elements.
    • I prayed that they might be spared the ravages of Ebola epidemics.
    • Who, amongst us, is invulnerable to the ravages of disease?
    • Unfortunately for him, icons are not supposed to succumb to the ravages of age.
    • He had endured the ravages of cancer bravely and patiently till the end.
    • It's even less fair to airbrush a 60-year-old celebrity and present her as someone who's managed to avoid the ravages of time.
    • Younger women are also not immune to the ravages of this disease.
    • Even the English king Edward I failed to escape the ravages of foot-and-mouth.
    • The granite base is intact, and has withstood the constant ravages of time.