There are 2 main translations of rear in Spanish

: rear1rear2

rear1

parte trasera, n.

Pronunciation /rɪə//rɪr/

noun

  • 1

    (back part)
    parte trasera feminine
    parte posterior feminine
    parte de atrás feminine
    a room at or (US also) in the rear of the building una habitación en la parte trasera / en la parte de atrás del edificio
    • the courtyard at or (US also) in the rear of the building el patio de detrás del edificio
    • the rear of the train los últimos vagones del tren
    • she sat in the rear iba sentada atrás / en el asiento trasero
    • the people at or (US also) in the rear couldn't hear la gente que estaba al fondo no oía
    • The protesters even attempted to approach the building from the rear, and called on TV channels to broadcast the action.
    • Even though no roads are in the way in the rear of the building, it's just as effectively sealed off from its surroundings as if it were surrounded by a moat.
    • Staff vehicles enter at the rear of the building by means of a ramp that leads down to a subterranean car park.
    • Stromness Fire Brigade were called out and extinguished the fire, which caused minor damage to the doors at the rear of the building.
    • What made you decide to move from the front part of the building to the rear?
    • As I landed the aircraft, I sensed a pronounced increase in the overall vibration level coming from the rear of the aircraft.
    • The meeting will be held in Rathkeeland House in the U3A office, which is to the rear of the building.
    • One of the buildings at the rear of the main house dates from that time.
    • While the front of the building floats, the rear is rooted in the brick and stone structure that houses the kitchen, toilets and study rooms.
    • Scorch damage was caused to the rear of the vehicle.
    • The missile has four rectangular fins for aerodynamic control at the rear, and four wings at just over halfway from nose to tail on the length of the body.
    • However, by using the right analog stick, you can train the camera on both sides and the rear of your vehicle.
    • There was a terrific crash as it ‘bounced’ on the front and another as the rear fell into the river.
    • For this reason, the last vehicle in the convoy should always be one with armed troops facing the rear.
    • A two-storey mews at the rear of the building fronts onto Laverty Court providing access to the car park.
    • These transducers are usually mounted on a beam that is attached to either the front or the rear of the host vehicle.
    • The impact caused a fire in the rear of the vehicle which then spread inside and raged through the entire bus, leaving nothing but a blackened skeleton.
    • The overall exterior design is characterized by straight lines and a raised rear.
    • He and two volunteers settle into the carpeted rear of the vehicle, walkie-talkies in hand, and peer out the windows.
    • The fuselage is tubular and cigar-shaped tapering to the rear with a rounded, glassed-in nose and bubble canopy.
  • 2

    (of column, procession)
    the rear la retaguardia
  • 3informal

    (buttocks)
    trasero masculine informal
    • Good thing we'll burn it all off by sitting on our rears for another three days.
    • Pull one of your feet up to your rear, and turn the foot outwards away from the body.
    • If our folks sit on their rears, the Republicans are better organized in Pennsylvania than they've ever been.
    • If developers rampantly fail to produce good software, but the company exceeds earnings estimates anyway, how many of those rears will be actually on the line?
    • Be sure to quickly bring your heels up to your rear in a tight tuck.
    • Now Macy's in New York is endorsing big bottoms by adding an extra 2.5in to their dummies' rears.
    • We're not getting off our rears and just walking places.
    • I could imagine what it would be like to have that dog bolling his way down the mall hallway, sniffing people's rears and grabbing bags out of unsuspecting hands.
    • Then, one after the other, they hit the same tiny protrusion which caused their rears to topple over their fronts.
    • These athletes have such great-looking rears because their sport effectively targets the gluteal muscles.

adjective

  • 1

    (window/wheel) de atrás
    (wheel/window) trasero
    the rear entrance la puerta de atrás
    • rear lamp / light luz trasera / de atrás
    • the rear windows overlook a garden las ventanas de atrás / del fondo dan a un jardín
    • The damaged floodlights are several feet high and are made of toughened glass similar to that used in the rear window of a car.
    • She checks her rear view mirrors, but she does not check the door.
    • I live smack between two bridges, and I see them both from my rear windows - I can see them now.
    • He stood there for a while and watched me pour what remained of my bucket of water over the rear window, and jump to one side so it would not hit my feet.
    • Side running boards are still available while a new rear bumper has been added.
    • The proximity of the two tanks also demanded a quick release and clearance before the rear motor compartment of the lead tank sustained damage.
    • Help speed up the de-icing process by switching on the engine and the rear window heater, but never leave your car running unattended, it's an invitation to thieves.
    • Officers believe a spade was used to force a rear window.
    • There is a lined and padded soft roof that now has a heated, scratch-proof rear glass window.
    • The car's striking, swept-back rear window pillars also contribute to its more muscular appearance.
    • Double doors lead to the rear garden, ensuring that this area is light-filled.
    • The rear garden has a southerly aspect and is not overlooked from the back.
    • Several shots rang out and police commandos stormed the bus through the rear window.
    • As they drove away, Coen looked back once in the rear view mirror.
    • Dad stopped on the highway, I got out, and he sped away with Mom and my five younger brothers and sisters staring out the rear window.
    • As the trailer rises, the weight gets transferred to the rear axles.
    • The back end was completely crumpled and the rear window was shattered.
    • If your weight is too far back, your rear wheel will bog down.
    • One round went through my already shattered rear window; another whistled past my head.
    • The remix sounds much better than expected, though rear speakers were not utilized much.
    • Its two back seat occupants clambered out through the car's shattered rear window and ran off.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (horse) empinarse
    (horse) pararse en dos patas Latin America
    (with anger, fear) encabritarse
    • Nothing much was done for them and nobody feared that they would rear up in protest.
    • The alpha males (I guess) feel obliged to rear up periodically and assert their fiefdom with a ‘roar.’
    • The farmer rears up contemptuously and roars, ‘You ever been hit in the head with a ‘soft rock’, boy?’
    • Every time I think that the studios are slow in getting what's going on out here, the traditional media rears up to let me know that they're even slower.
    • Glennon and Holmes reared up on the referee: ‘We're not going to be dictated to by television,’ Glennon told him.
    • She held him upright and kind of buried his face in her shoulder, which didn't seem right, but neither of the Grans reared up on her, so it must have been okay.
    • Whereupon she reared up as well as she could, agitated, and exclaimed, ‘I haven't got a disease, have I, doctor?’
    • Then that feisty optimist rears up in me, and my commitment deepens to enjoying this brief ride on the only green planet I happen to know of.
    • They all make me want to rear up and shout there are starving children in India, but I suspect that their entire lives are based around refuting the relevance of that reminder.
    • He rears up and instills fear into the hearts of his adversaries.
    • Already last night difficulties were rearing up.
  • 2

    (tower)
    erguirse
    alzarse
    the mountains reared before us las montañas se erguían / se alzaban ante nosotros
    • Lahore station rears out of the surrounding anarchy like a liner out of the ocean.
    • A metallic roar cuts through the stillness, and out of the murk further up the valley a gigantic shape rears, an uprooted sapling clutched in its metal talons.
    • The mountains now rear before us like terrestrial tsunamis - snow-peaked surf in five-thousand metre sets.
    • The jagged Caucasus reared above these lush hills and even before Mestia it was clear that Svaneti's fabled splendour was no exaggeration.
    • The forest thinned as branches parted; a few hamlets dotted grassy slopes below and thickly-wooded hills reared above.
    • They are shaped like Mayan temples and they rear above the light and smog with the astonishing bulk of Ayers Rock in the desert.
    • Behind it rear an assortment of rolling hills and mountains, dominated by Ben Lui.
    • Beyond the yawning valley reared a jagged skyline dominated by the massive peaks of Tirich Mir and Buni Zom.
    • The car pulled up the organization's main building; the old Irish castle seemed to rear like a rock out of the flat earth.
    • Far below, beneath shreds of glistening cloud, York is laid out like a map: the Ouse glinting in the sun, the Minster rearing above the clutter of buildings around its feet.
    • Above us a wall of broken black rock rears steeply.
    • Beyond it, the Cumbrian mountains rear, an impenetrable barrier.

There are 2 main translations of rear in Spanish

: rear1rear2

rear2

criar, v.

transitive verb

  • 1

    (raise)
    (cattle/child/horses) criar
    • The firm rears chickens from just days old and processes them through to cooked finished products.
    • It could be streptococcus suis, a bacteria endemic in most pig rearing nations.
    • There, they reared four children, Tommy, Shelley, Terry and Angela.
    • The cubs are reared until they are about six months old and then slaughtered.
    • By May, weighing-in at around 40 lb, the lamb rearing cycle comes to an end.
    • Firstly, most pork is produced from pigs reared indoors and some would have been frozen.
    • She felt her baby had a better chance with new parents better equipped to rear her child.
    • Jackson used the exercise to demonstrate the challenges parents face in rearing children.
    • In the southern Karas region, which is cattle rearing area, Kangowa said grazing will be so poor that the government is encouraging farmers to sell their livestock.
    • She has her memories, she reared her children here and it is where she is most content.
    • As it is sometimes difficult to rear young calves it is a good thing to keep them clean and dry., whitewashing the calf hulls two or three times during the winter.
    • But in 1996, a Swiss animal behaviourist noticed that mice and rats reared this way might actually be decidedly abnormal.
    • Her business is now concentrated at Orielton Mill, Hundleton, where she plans to rear young trout to sell on to other fish farmers.
    • What lawyers call the doctrine of parental authority grants parents wide latitude to rear their children as they choose.
    • Affectionate though he admittedly may be, he is thinking more about rearing the children than about impressing them.
    • Among the many health problems facing families rearing children in low income countries are two common conditions - postnatal depression and infant failure to thrive.
    • In the end, she believes that how parents rear a child will have a stronger effect than what they read.
    • One school of thought is that it's designed to last long enough for a couple to rear children to the point where they are relatively self-sufficient.
    • The sheep penned were good specimens of the best breeds, and the standard was of a high order and enhanced the reputation of this part of the Cotswold Hills as a sheep rearing country.
    • Young fish were also reared in hatchery tanks and released as smolts, the stage at which salmon head to sea before traveling to northerly feeding grounds.
    • More women are returning to work, particularly those who have reared their children and who now find they are in demand in the workplace.
    • Do those parents try to rear their child to be as like them as possible, as indistinguishable as possible from its hearing peers?
    • Although I feel very passionately with her that rearing children is itself a job.
    • A high percentage of Welsh turkey producers are concentrated in Pembrokeshire - a county recognised nationally as an important poultry rearing region.
    • Fish farms were established during Roman times when they built ‘vivaria’, areas where spawn and young fish were reared for the table.
    • If you are really concerned about animal cruelty then take a look at our abattoir system or investigate battery chicken farms or focus on the intensive cattle/pig rearing methods employed in some parts of Europe.
    • But the Supreme Court ruling does put a high value on the contribution a wife makes to rearing the children and supporting her husband as he builds his career and wealth.
    • Marriage is the basis of the family, and it is in healthy families that children are reared to be honorable people and good citizens.
    • The movie placed a great emphasis on the role of women in America, suggesting that women's roles are not only getting married and rearing children, but women can do anything they want.
    • In the meantime, there is a clause in the will that allows the trustees to allocate money from the fund to the guardians for any financial requirements that may arise from rearing the children.
    • I really want to tell parents about what I think they should look for in rearing their children.
    • These larvae were reared separately until eclosion and both classes were viable.
    • Hugh describes growing vegetables and rearing animals, as well as cooking them, in an unpretentious manner.
    • Cattle rearing remains part of prairie Cajun life today, but the spread of agriculture, especially rice, has reduced both its economic importance and much of its flamboyant ways.
    • Calf rearing systems must aim to produce rapid growth rates matched by proper rumen development.
    • This means that the original enslaver was not concerned with the ‘cost of production’ - the cost of rearing a child until it was old enough to be sold into the trade.
    • Applications are welcome from families in the parish who have reared their own children and now may have more free time on their hands.
    • The scientists from the University of California at San Francisco reared young rats in an environment of moderate continuous noise.
    • A good, well-organised calf rearing system should be a priority for any dairy farmer, and this does not mean that you go and put up an expensive calf house.
    • He and his wife Eileen have reared six children and his three sons have all worn the Ellistown jersey with distinction.
  • 2

    (lift)
    (head) levantar
    head