Translation of reproach in Spanish:

reproach

Pronunciation /rəˈproʊtʃ//rɪˈprəʊtʃ/

transitive verb

  • 1

    to reproach sb for-ing/with sth
    • he reproached her for not having written to him le reprochó que no le hubiera escrito
    • I have nothing to reproach myself with no tengo nada que reprocharme
    • Tom is continually reproaching me for being extravagant/with extravagance Tom me reprocha continuamente (el) que gaste tanto

noun

  • 1

    (blame, rebuke)
    reproche masculine
    words/a look of reproach palabras/una mirada de reproche
    • above / beyond reproach irreprochable
    • During a small seminar in Freiburg, he actually reproaches Heidegger for inattentiveness.
    • The hint of reproach in ‘omission’ may not be quite fair to either of us.
    • Aunt Alice frowned slightly at this reproach against her motherly duties, but the sorrow in her beautiful eyes could not be from this reproach alone, it was too deep.
    • Some of his published works have met with strong criticism and reproach.
    • Although rock had become mainstream by the early 1970s, it continued to arouse resistance and to elicit reproach - and continues, indeed, to this day.
    • Interestingly, those last reproaches are similar to the grievances aired by Wanda's husband while he's waiting for her in court.
    • Perhaps the most horrible aspect of Frank's world is not the existence of cruelty, but rather the possibility that life might be shaped by nothing more than the whims of others beyond control or reproach.
    • One of the main reproaches was the Australians' failure to hold the so-called Gap in the Owen Stanleys.
    • The poem's thought about the aetiology of war, its main theme, is based on Christ's reproach of the Pharisees, who had upbraided the disciples for not washing their hands before eating.
    • The reproach was lightly mocking and they both laughed.
    • Nevertheless, the commission issued strong reproaches of the government.
    • All those reproaches aimed at us should have been directed against them, because their cinema was completely unreal.
    • Instead, I just dialled my mother's phone number, bracing myself against her reproaches.
    • No less absurd is the second reproach thrown upon capitalism - namely, that technological and therapeutical innovations do not benefit all people.
    • Stung by his reproach, she counters by reminding him that her lack of ardor is understandable given their night of lovemaking.
    • Painfully, torturedly, he bit his lip to keep the stream of reproaches and denials from bursting through the dam of his control.
    • That does not mean that the French reproaches against the British were all well founded.
    • Look at the Closet scene: Hamlet has just killed a man, Polonius, yet he heaps reproaches upon his mother's head for daring to re-marry.
    • They cite the demands, reproaches and scaremongering of an obsessed media.
    • The characters often look up to the gods for guidance, speak of them and reproach them for putting such a predicament onto mortals of flesh and blood.
  • 2formal

    (discredit)
    to be a reproach to sb/sth ser un oprobio / una deshonra para algn/algo formal
    • For Billy the boy is a nagging reminder of his own delinquent youth: for Shirley-Diane he is a strange mix of sex object and living reproach.