Translation of rhetoric in Spanish:

rhetoric

retórica, n.

Pronunciation /ˈrɛtərɪk//ˈrɛdərɪk/

noun

  • 1

    retórica feminine
    • He too is the victim of the fashionable notion of rhetoric, logic and truth that was so widely admired at the time.
    • It is the common rhetoric in the aftermath of wars that, with the war once won, the peace must not then be lost.
    • Gellert's lectures on poetry, rhetoric, and ethics were exceptionally popular.
    • They may have seen themselves as reviving a more ancient tradition, that of rhetoric.
    • In short, one can take the science out of rhetoric but not the rhetoric out of science.
    • The problem is that using modernist rhetoric does not make one modern.
    • But during his twenties he was not only teaching Latin literature and the arts of rhetoric.
    • Young Athenian democrats needed rhetoric to persuade the democratic assemblies.
    • This rhetoric was imitated in Elizabethan schools and began to make an impact on the stage.
    • It may well be that the cities no longer had the resources to support a roster of teachers of grammar and rhetoric.
    • The devices of rhetoric, however, did not lose their links with poetry or their practical ties with the law.
    • As an ability, rhetoric is observable when people choose to engage in it.
    • But both these opposite models of our selves are equally powerful in current rhetoric.
    • Born into a rich provincial family, he studied philosophy as well as rhetoric and law.
    • In the late twentieth century rhetoric has been revived as the study of the structuring powers of discourse.
    • From this perspective, Ovidian rhetoric works to conceal the very desire that organizes it.
    • Are the audience really shocked into new ideas about rhetoric, oppression and language?
    • Much of the earlier writing is political rhetoric; much of the later is album verse.
    • In either case, we can see that both argument and rhetoric are designed to persuade and impress.
    • Invoke the slippery slope and construct a straw man to knock down with one fell swoop of rhetoric.