There are 4 main translations of row in Spanish

: ROW1row2row3row4

ROW1

noun

  • 1

    Rest of the World


There are 4 main translations of row in Spanish

: ROW1row2row3row4

row2

hilera, n.

Pronunciation /roʊ//rəʊ/

noun

  • 1

    (straight line)
    hilera feminine
    (of people) fila feminine
    (of seats) fila feminine
    the trees were planted in a row los árboles estaban plantados en hilera
    • a row of houses una hilera de casas
    • they lined up in rows hicieron filas / se formaron en fila
    • a seat in the front/fifth row un asiento en primera fila/en la quinta fila
    • Four men in black uniforms, along with a plainclothed man with a large ID badge, walked past us to an aisle seat about eight rows behind me.
    • We pulled up into a winding driveway that was lined by a row of rose bushes, all in full bloom.
    • I sat in the back of the theatre about ten rows behind them.
    • Devon, Joannah, and Layla found a seat in the row before the last of the full theatre.
    • I'm seated in the third row, just forward of the semicircular bleachers that surround the stage and the rear band area.
    • Being a tall man, Paddy had requested a seat at the exit row.
    • The pink, caterpillar-like larvae have rows of black spots along their sides.
    • Not one to miss the opportunity, he grabbed honours by occupying a seat in the first row.
    • Within a week of the wedding, he was back at the theater, ensconced in his customary aisle seat in the third row.
    • This property is on the sunny side of Fitzwilliam Terrace, a row of redbrick houses on Upper Rathmines Road.
    • Wearing sunglasses and a dark suit, he found a seat in an unoccupied row.
    • Her eyes automatically went to the row of photographs lining the top shelf.
    • The walls were lined from floor to ceiling with nothing but rows and rows of books.
    • We quietly filed in, formed rows and stood an arm's length apart.
    • In most parts of the world the vineyard is a well-defined entity, generally well demarcated by the borders of the straight rows.
    • She put her school books in a neat row, making sure her books stood up straight.
    • There were peas, and beans, and rows of young turnips, and carrots, and parsnips, all bordered by long straight rows of wheat.
    • Rows and rows of red velvet chairs lined the large room.
    • Later photographs of the square show a row of rickshaws lined up in the square, and horses and carriages.
    • Along the street behind the gates rows of shops sell fresh produce, including unusual items such as sacks of soybeans, sea cucumbers and shark's fins for soup.
    • Above ground, an amphitheater lined with seven double rows of cypress trees echoes the octagonal space below.
    • Family photos cover one of the walls, straight rows of memories that seem to blend into one another.
    • The desks in Jan's classroom were arranged in four orderly horizontal rows.
    • Even though fleece doesn't ravel, the rows of stitching lines need to be sewn on the bias to achieve a good bloom.
    • Her son, Rahul Gandhi, was seated in the third row behind Gandhi.
    • I peered over the edge of the seat in front of me and looked down the rows below to see if she was still in the theater.
    • Spring sown crops of corn are looking promising, with their straight green rows, and potatoes are being planted as fast as everyone can manage.
    • If planting strictly for cut flowers, then straight rows are the easiest to work with.
    • George went in the direction Sal indicated and opened the specified cabinet, to reveal two long shelves lined with rows of bottles.
    • The children seated in the first row were running around the hall dispersing the sweets to the ones who had got the answers right.
    • Tobias grinned again, exposing two rows of straight white teeth.
  • 2

    (in knitting)
    pasada feminine
    carrera feminine
    vuelta feminine
    corrida feminine Chile
    • It will work without knitting this one extra row, but it is easier to sew it together if you do
    • To quilt the sashing and borders, set the machine for a serpentine stitch and stitch parallel rows down the strips.
    • Dawn was stitching the last row when Tobit barged in, followed by Will.
    • I added 5 extra rows on the collar in stocking stitch so that I would have a roll in the collar, which is easier to pull over the head than ribbing.
    • Insert the filler for the next row in the same manner and stitch across the channels; repeat for the two remaining pocket rows.
    • With right sides together, sew the long edges of your horizontal rows together until all four sets are sewn together.
    • At this point there are six unworked stitches at each end of the row.
    • Instead of starting with 38 stitches for the cuffs, I cast on 46 and increased 2 stitches every 6 rows.
    • When straight stitching both rows, stretch the seam equally both times.
    • Decide how many rows of decorative stitching you want, then pleat an additional two rows.
  • 3

    (succession)
    serie feminine
    he experienced a row of failures sufrió fracaso tras fracaso
    • four times in a row cuatro veces seguidas
    • three days in a row tres días seguidos

There are 4 main translations of row in Spanish

: ROW1row2row3row4

row3

Pronunciation /rəʊ//roʊ/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (propel)
    he rowed the boat towards the shore remó hacia la orilla
    • we rowed them/the supplies across the river los llevamos/llevamos las provisiones hasta la otra orilla a remo
    • they rowed her out to the ship la llevaron en bote hasta el barco
    • She rowed the boat down the waterway, her anger slowly subsiding.
    • A girl rows a raft made from banana-tree shoots in the flooded Samata, 35 km east of Guwahati, on Thursday.
    • She began furiously rowing the boat to the right, trying to escape the current.
    • Gil and Marle each picked up a paddle and started rowing the boat away from the harbor.
    • Sometimes, in calm seas, when the outboard stuttered and needed coaxing with frequent plug de-oilings, Angus would row the boat.
    • The Orsay picture is the more finished of the two, showing five faceless men rowing their boat through a choppy sea towards a waiting ship on the horizon.
    • David noticed that square holes had been cut in the hull to allow oarsmen to row the ship despite the fact that it possessed a single mast with a sail.
    • We tried our hand rowing a boat on the lake which was completely riotous.
    • Our staff will row the rafts, cook, and provide special activities for the children.
    • When about 50 yards from the shore the pinnaces cast off, leaving the boats to be rowed to the beach by their naval crews, under covering fire from the warships.
    • Physical challenges included rowing the raft across a lake, taking on an assault course, with and without heavy equipment to carry, and jogging over a daytime orienteering course.
    • Dallas rowed the little boat up alongside the fishing rig.
    • The ferryman dies and Siddhartha is left to row the ferry himself.
    • Our final day was again beautifully sunny, if freezing, so we decided to row a boat around one of Donegal's many lochs.
    • One dark night he helped row a collapsible boat carrying a dozen men half a mile out to sea in the hope of finding a ship to take them.
    • He was unable to row the boat and couldn't steer the vessel having lost his rudder on day one of the voyage.
    • The Italian crew will row their flagship, the Disdotona, on the way back from the Henley Regatta, accompanied by two Venetian racing fours.
    • The Turkish galleys were rowed by slaves: some of the Christian ships were rowed by volunteers.
    • The old ferryman has become so frail that he no longer rows the ferry.
    • It is glorious weather, the waterway full of small boats, some being rowed, some under sail, when suddenly there is the sound of shouting as the peaceful afternoon is shattered.

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (propel boat)
    remar
    to go rowing salir / ir a remar
    • to row across a river cruzar un río a remo
    • We ate some breakfast and jumped into our rafts and rowed down to the southeastern end of Otter Lake.
    • In the past, he spent many an hour rowing down the River Barrow.
    • He was still smiling as the boat hit the water and until we had rowed so far away that he was indistinguishable from the other people still on the ship.
    • There was a river mouth near to the beach and we would often row up the river and set a net off one of the mangrove heads, partially blocking the tributary.
    • Mr Butler rowed single-handed across the Atlantic in 2001.
    • They crossed the sand bar at the mouth of the river, before rowing up river for three miles.
    • As we rowed down the river I could see fish in a reed fringed bay.
    • They took the ship's boat and rowed to shore in the dead of night.
    • One day, Ramsay three times pushed the boat away from shore as the men rowed across from their encampment to commence work.
    • Campus staff occasionally rowed out to the lake centre in a wooden boat to spread fish food more evenly onto the lake surface.
    • Then he rows across the river, releasing more net before he turns upstream to row back in a circular route to where the leading end was released.
    • The freshmen eight rowed downstream for three and a halt miles in easy stretches and return, being coached from the launch by Coach Kennedy.
    • With swift strokes, she rowed away from the dock.
    • And to row across the river instead of taking the bridge; it seemed unnecessarily complicated.
    • You used to row out to your boat moored away from the shore.
    • To others I said I rowed all the way by myself in a boat and they swallowed that as well.

noun

Sport

  • 1

    (for enjoyment)
    we went for a row fuimos / salimos a remar / a dar un paseo en bote
    • Sonia is the first kiwi competing on the first full day of competition in Athens, rowing in her single sculls heat around early Saturday evening.
    • He used to row with Hollingworth Lake Rowing Club and still rows competitively with the Royal Chester Rowing Club.
    • He will be rowing with Matthew Pinsent in the coxless pairs.
    • Teti rowed on the national team for over a decade before becoming coach at Princeton University for nine years.
    • It was the very first time that I ever rowed in a competitive event.
    • They will be rowing in the lightweight coxless four team which finished in the top ten of the World Cup final in Lucerne, Switzerland.
    • Some clearly rowed their hardest races to reach the finals and were unable to repeat the effort in the final.
    • Kelly rowed to gold in this event as a junior last year and as stroke today she was moving the boat at a solid 32 strokes per minute.
    • Gillett, 29, took up competitive cycling in 2000, having rowed for Australia at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.
    • He was also involved in rowing for many years and had few equals in that sport especially when he rowed in the Bluebird in the late sixties and early seventies.
    • During the tour participants would rotate so that each day they rowed with a different crew.
    • Polymeros described the chemistry that has existed between the two of them ever since they rowed together as club rowers.
    • He was a fit man, apart from fairly well controlled hypertension, who had been rowing competitively until his 70th birthday, and he rarely visited his general practitioner.
    • Cracknell, who rowed in Britain's coxless four triumph at the last Olympic Games in Sydney, said the win was even sweeter after the ups and downs the boat had endured this season.
    • DeFrantz rowed for the United States at the 1976 Olympics winning bronze in the women's eight.
    • Neither of the teams have rowed before but each boat has three experienced rowers to help them.

There are 4 main translations of row in Spanish

: ROW1row2row3row4

row4

pelea, n.

Pronunciation /raʊ//raʊ/

noun

  • 1

    (noisy argument)
    pelea feminine
    riña feminine
    a family row una rencilla familiar
    • to have a row with sb pelearse / reñir con algn
    • Such rows usually end up with Tanya storming out of the pub and staying out until her disapproval has been duly noted.
    • Yes we still had arguments, sometimes blazing rows but knowing we were in this for the long haul we sat down and talked about it and I mean really talked.
    • One witness who was drinking in the bar said the row started over a disagreement over politics.
    • In a later incident, during a row, he lost control and punched her in the face.
    • She rushed to a nearby pub to get help when the row broke out.
    • Scott knew about the fights and rows with Hallie that seemed to be Jesse's main concern all the time.
    • Last weekend was a busy one for local police, as there were a number of serious rows in the town on Saturday night and Sunday morning.
    • The couple, who claim they have never had a serious row, say their secret to a happy marriage is always listening to one another and laughing together.
    • For a start, don't make things worse: avoid anger, rows, confrontation and ultimatums.
    • The row escalated into a fight involving a group of others, and Miss Edwards was bitten by Tanner on the arm.
    • A motorist who went drinking after a row with his fiancée knocked down and killed a pedestrian just seconds after driving away from a violent collision.
    • Neighbours said the couple occasionally had noisy rows and sometimes appeared aloof, but they were otherwise unremarkable.
    • There was a row and fracas between the two women and all were thrown out.
    • The police officer said that on the date in question he received a report of a row in the town square.
    • Golding claimed the police over-reacted and it led to a row and a scuffle.
    • He said that in any home, rows and arguments were commonplace but there was a line that should not be crossed.
    • The couple's noisy row drew the attention of neighbors and local officials, who explained to them the news surrounding the food scare.
    • Late-night rows throughout the festivities threatened to engulf innocent bystanders and shocked tourists.
    • One neighbour, a teenager who did not want to be named, told how she had heard a noisy row.
    • Prosecutors allege that after a row in which insults were exchanged, Collins returned to his house in All Saints Street and returned with a knife in each hand.
  • 2

    (about a public matter)
    disputa feminine
    • The woman at the centre of the health row, who is not being named, strongly denied the claim.
    • A new row has erupted over controversial plans to build ‘eyesore’ wind turbines at a Yorkshire beauty spot.
    • There's a row brewing about a new translation of the Mass.
    • Demonstrators united in a solid show of support for a university professor at the centre of a sacking row.
    • A Planning Service approval to build a multi-storey apartment block in Newry is at the centre of a blazing row.
    • The organist at the centre of a long-running row at a Yorkshire church is set to leave the area and take up a new post in Germany.
    • The bitter nine-month dispute began as a row with John and Anna Atwood over a shared driveway.
    • Your child will be making all her own choices as an adult soon enough, and there's no sense in huge disputes and rows if she wants to start now.
    • At the centre of the row is the new dentistry contract, which is expected in the autumn.
    • York's archives, which detail 800 years of the city's history, have been at the centre of a relocation row.
    • Memorial benches meant to be a lasting tribute to three friends killed in a car crash are at the centre of a row between police and the families of those killed.
    • By the weekend, however, as unheard cases were adjourned in the District Court, there was the beginning of a nervousness that the row could become serious.
    • Any plans to fast-track incineration projects are likely to cause a serious row in the cabinet.
    • A promotions company at the centre of a financial row following two outdoor concerts has gone into liquidation.
    • He managed to end the rows and squabbles in his party and made a rather good impression in the debates.
    • A former bowling green is at the centre of a row between residents and developers over plans to put homes on it.
    • There have been and continue to be serious tensions and bitter rows - but all concerned have dealt with these in a very adult and professional way.
    • A report to the council's monthly meeting yesterday said two or three more surgical appointments could be made without impacting on the two posts at the centre of the row.
    • The bishop was at the centre of a row yesterday over a document designed to protect traditionalist Anglicans who are opposed to women priests.
    • A hospital at the centre of a row after failing to diagnose two patients with cancer has received praise from independent inspectors for its cancer care.
  • 3

    (noise)
    ruido masculine
    bulla feminine informal
    • Then, from the other end of house, she said she heard ‘an awful row, shouting and raised voices, a real commotion’.
    • I would describe the sound as a horrible row, but as I'm in the band I would like to think it is hard punk!

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (argue)
    pelearse
    reñir
    • The Mayor warned he will expel members from the chamber if they don't stop rowing.
    • The girl had been drinking wine and a cocktail that night and she was escorted from the bar by staff after rowing with a former boyfriend and pushing a waitress.
    • She rows with her auld man over his tactics and also has a go at poor Brendan whom she pours a drink over.
    • You do have your differences in a band, there is no denying that, but we would never row or argue about things.
    • Heather, at the wedding with her boyfriend, has rowed with her cousin Lorna, who turns her nose up at everything about Kilronan.
    • Officers believe that the man was unhappy about the marriage and, having travelled from his home town, rowed with the bride before she was killed.