Translation of scimitar in Spanish:

scimitar

cimitarra, n.

Pronunciation: /ˈsɪməˌtɑr//ˈsɪmədər//ˈsɪmɪtə/

noun

  • 1

    cimitarra feminine
    alfanje masculine
    • The claws on the monstrosity jutted out and curved like a dozen scimitars.
    • He winced when he realized that he was holding onto the hilt of his scimitar, and let go of his weapon with a snort.
    • He clenched his fists around the hilts of his scimitars at the idea.
    • It contained a number of wooden replicas, including his scimitars, spear, and axe.
    • Michael had his scimitar, Monica her rapier, Eric a mace, and Erin a pick.
    • Other items include Russian swords, scimitars and a shield from Turkey.
    • The killer puts the hands into a sack he's carrying and starts to take the scimitar out of a scabbard he wears.
    • His fingers knew their path - knew the twin scimitars from point to hilt.
    • She shot an ice-charged projectile down at the scimitars, but the whirling cutters diced it to ribbons in the blink of an eye.
    • Rhea pressed her scimitar's blade against the spear, but she simply couldn't cut through.
    • The blades of scimitars could be seen beneath their robes.
    • They were both wielding large, curved scimitars; they swung them about menacingly, circling them.
    • Each rider carried one of many weapons - a wicked scimitar, a powerful lance, or a flail.
    • He carried no javelins or shield, and was equipped with his scimitars and twin daggers.
    • While a good percentage of them had guns or rifles, some also carried scimitars and daggers.
    • He turned his blade to the side and caught her scimitar in his cross guard, then launched his body forward.
    • At the wrist, the blade became smoother, becoming a short scimitar that extended nearly a foot forward.
    • Faces half covered, long curving scimitars sheathed at their sides, they walked along the narrow, trodden path, from which all onlookers hastily cleared.
    • It hissed at him entrancingly, standing and drawing two wickedly curved scimitars from between its scales.
    • A trio of rogue English thugs is in pursuit of the same artifact, as are scads of very large Egyptian and African chappies with huge scimitars and daggers.