Translation of scorch in Spanish:

scorch

chamuscar, v.

Pronunciation: /skɔrtʃ//skɔːtʃ/

transitive verb

  • 1

    (fabric) chamuscar
    (fabric) quemar
    (sun) quemar
    (sun) agostar
    (sun) abrasar
    the sun had scorched the fields/grass el sol había agostado / abrasado los campos/la hierba
    • it was so hot I scorched my tongue estaba tan caliente que me quemé / me abrasé la lengua
    • the iron scorched her sleeve la plancha le chamuscó / le quemó la manga
    • scorched-earth policy estrategia militar que consiste en arrasar todo lo que puede serle útil al enemigo

intransitive verb

  • 1

    (become scorched)
    (fabric) chamuscarse
    (food) quemarse
  • 2

    (vehicle/person)
    (go fast)
    ir a toda velocidad
    ir a todo lo que da informal
    ir a toda mecha informal

noun

  • 1

    quemadura superficial feminine
    before noun scorch mark marca de quemadura superficial
    • The sides of the spear-shaped entity were scorched by liquefying flames produced within the inner stomach of the wormhole.
    • The countryside had been scorched; the acacia hedges were tipped with orange.
    • The heat scorched at her hair and the smoke burned her lungs after every breath.
    • They're making the most of the cooler weather in Southern California where a wildfire scorched more than 24,000 acres.
    • The edged complex fire has scorched 38,000 acres so far and continues to grow.
    • I could feel the heat surrounding me, burning me, scorching my skin, causing me to cry out wordlessly in pain.
    • Vegas scorches in the summer; average July temperatures hover near 100 degrees.
    • Like a moth to flame, heat scorched her flesh in his presence.
    • The bombs blew up, burning the air and scorching my wings!
    • The bright suns rays touched her sneakers, scorching them with fiery heat.
    • Shrubbery around the find was badly scorched from the attempt to set the bodies on fire.
    • The water burnt him, he hoped it would be hot enough to scorch away his wickedness.
    • In winter much of it is under snow; in spring grass appears, which is scorched dry and swept by the dust storms of summer.
    • She felt the hot rays of heat scorching her skin, yet she loved the sensation they gave her.
    • Later, we hike into Limestone Gorge, through a corroded landscape of dolomite blocks, bizarre limestone tower karsts, twisted Screw Palms and scorched yellow grasses.
    • Away from the package holidaymakers, she is free to explore the scorched Mediterranean landscape and investigate what it is that seems to be wrong with her.
    • I felt like I was walking in an endless desert, with the afternoon sun scorching my skin.
    • Closely following it was a blast of heat which scorched clothes, ignited buildings and set even the individual blades of grass on fire.
    • A disheartening scene flashed into view: a barren landscape, fruitless, scorched by a blazing, merciless sun.
    • Her armour was scorched and burnt away in places, revealing blistered skin and burn wounds severe enough to make an experienced doctor wince.
    • A roar of laughter shot through the room and several flames scorched the ceiling.
    • The summer heat proved particularly brutal to men marching in hot wool uniforms, and the landscape stretched before them, an unending plain of scorched grassland.
    • They burned like acid, scorching a path wherever they brushed her pale skin.
    • Nationwide, fires scorched 7.4 million acres, almost twice the 10-year average.
    • I live in an area that was scorched by drought for several years.
    • The Sun will become a red giant, still hot enough to burn planets to cinders as it engulfs Mercury and Venus and scorches Earth.
    • His fighting gear was singed and tattered, and his face and exposed flesh was scorched.
    • The sun was high in the sky, its rays reaching down and scorching the Earth.
    • The landscape of Western Australia is wild, scorched and beautiful, and the language of his latest book is seductive, distinctive, also beautiful.
    • In addition, parching scorches off the long barbed ends of the chaff and destroys any detritus left after cleaning.
    • Somewhere there is a desert ruled by a sun that knows no malice, a sun that never scorches; warm, healing, nurturing, smiling softly down with love for all that is beneath it and all who pass through it.