Translation of sepulchral in Spanish:

sepulchral

sepulcral, adj.

Pronunciation: /sɪˈpʌlkr(ə)l//səˈpəlkrəl/

adjective

  • 1

    sepulcral
    • Someone sitting on a vinyl picnic chair in a rumpled gray robe sat with his back to the door, long legs dangling over a four-foot tall ornamental railing built from a row of white sepulchral urns.
    • Mother and son lie together, sepulchral white sheets covering them, rejoined in a kind of death, and David can finally close his eyes and dream.
    • Shafts of direct sunlight are carefully choreographed to shine down directly onto the altar, their intensity emphasized by the sepulchral semi-darkness of the surroundings.
    • Unintelligible Latinisms litter the insides of the booklet, awkwardly coupling with sepulchral imagery.
    • One is reminded of the painted marble disc of the doctor Aineas, of late Archaic date, but that almost certainly was a sepulchral monument, and in any case can never have been mounted on a pillar in this fashion.
    • The men halted and whipped around to see a sepulchral ghost approach them.
    • A maze of sterile-looking, particle-board cubicles had been erected in the room and the lights dimmed to a sepulchral twilight.
    • The tenuous suggestion that Stonehenge may thus be a sepulchral monument, is perhaps strengthened by the large number of burial mounds in the surrounding landscape.
    • Even the most magnificent landscapes are powerless without figures, not forgetting Poussin's Arcadia, were it devoid of the shepherds and the sepulchral inscription.
    • Old relics dotted the entrance beyond; knots of yarn and wool rippled, brightly-colored etchings which reflected dully in the sepulchral gloom.
    • Tell us the worst, they said - and when I did, the silence was sepulchral.
    • The figure of Christ, his sepulchral pallor set off by a shroud of tender pink, confronts the viewer with awesome directness.
    • In the sepulchral gloom of the strip club two other dancers are substituted.
    • The author of a treatise on sepulchral urns lately discovered in Norfolk was moved to comment.
    • Gossip, therefore, died and a sepulchral silence descended on the shop except for the customers' self-obsessed questions and the barber's answers.
    • Now our stone may differ a little from the general run of Holed Stones found in many of the sepulchral monuments to be found in Western Europe to India.
    • C. Lefevre's 1907 monument in Paris for Emile Levassor, who died in a car crash, employed the full repertoire of classical sepulchral art.